Learning Styles

Ask yourself what comes to mind when you hear the word dog. Some people see a picture of the animal, others might hear a bark, while others sense the texture of the dog’s fur.

If you saw a picture of the dog, or saw the letters of the word, you are probably a visual learner. If you heard the dog bark, then your learning style would be auditory, and if you felt the soft fur of the dog, then your style is kinesthetic.

Visual learners would rather see a demonstration or read instructions. They call up images from the past when trying to remember, and they picture the way things look in their heads.

Auditory learners tend to spell phonetically. They can sometimes have trouble reading because they don’t visualize well. Instead, they learn by listening, talking, singing, or other activities using their hearing sense.

Kinesthetic learners learn best through movement and manipulation. They like to find out how things work, so participating in a demonstration rather than watching it helps them learn.

Most preschool children learn best through experience; therefore, they would be considered kinesthetic learners. Though people can use different learning styles, as we grow older we are pulled toward one preferred mode of learning. This is the mode we resort to when we are under stress or learning new information that is difficult to understand.

It is not unusual for parents to prefer a different style of learning from that of their child. By having a better understanding of each style, a parent has a better chance of helping their child learn with less frustration.

Experiment with different learning styles:

  • If your child is primarily a visual learner, then use diagrams, maps, graphs, and the Internet.
  • Memorizing a jingle, singing songs, and reading aloud are all activities that will support auditory learners.
  • Kinesthetic learners might better remember by manipulating letter blocks, creating a crossword puzzle, or doing math while bouncing on a trampoline. 

Trying different methods of learning may prevent your child from feeling frustrated and can improve their feeling of accomplishment.

 

 

Making Playdough

Making and playing with playdough together is fun and can lead to many conversations and creative moments!

LET’S GO!

What you need: 

  • 1 c salt
  • 1 3/4 c flour
  • 1 c cold water
  • 2 tsp. vegetable oil
  • 1 1/4 tbsp. corn starch
  • food colouring

What to do:

  1. In a bowl, mix together salt, water, oil, and food colouring (enough to make a bright colour).
  2. Add flour and corn starch.
  3. Knead the dough with your hands. Gradually add more flour if it’s too sticky, or oil if it isn’t sticking together.
  4. Store in a sealed bag in the fridge for up to 2 months.

 

DO IT TOGETHER!

Let your child help you measure and mix the ingredients. Show them the recipe and talk about how you know how much you need.

Use the playdough to make whatever you want—maybe letters, shapes, or something from a favourite book or song.

Talk about what you are doing and ask your child what they are making.

 

WHY?

Reading recipes is something that often happens in a home and not always just for cooking! Letting your child get involved will help them see how reading is used differently. Doing it together and using the end product is a great reward!

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

Bring a Book to Life

Doing something to extend a book beyond just reading it will help your child to understand the book!

LET’S GO!

Take a favourite story and act it out while you read.

DO IT TOGETHER!

As you read a book together, you can build on the story by acting it out with your child.

You can play dress-up and be the characters, or use your child’s toys, stuffed animals, or puppets as props.

Make up your own story, add new characters, or change the ending!

WHY?

Books don’t just have to be read, they can be starting points for other fun activities like crafts and pretend play. Acting out a story can help your child to understand it more easily and lets them use their imagination to decide how they want to do it.

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

Nursery Rhyme Fun

Nursery rhymes are a fun way for your child to hear how language works, which is the first step to becoming a reader and writer!

LET’S GO!

Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall,

Humpty Dumpty had a great fall,

All the king’s horses and all the king’s men

Couldn’t put Humpty together again!

 

DO IT TOGETHER!

Sit with your child facing you on your lap. Say the rhyme with lots of expression in your voice and on your face while you rock them. If they are older, let them pretend to fall off your lap when Humpty falls. Add some tickling after the rhyme by pretending you can put them back together with kisses.

WHY?

The rhyme, pattern, and repetition in a nursery rhyme can help your child learn how language works. It helps your child recognize sounds and rhyming words, which can help them learn to read and spell as they get older.

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

 

Real Pictures = Real Understanding

Drawings are hard for your baby to understand—they don’t always look like what your baby sees around them. Real pictures help with their understanding!

LET’S GO!

Choose books with pictures of real people, pets, or objects.

DO IT TOGETHER!

Share these books with your child by looking at the pictures, reading the words, and connecting what they see in the book to real objects in their life.

For example, if there is a picture of a teddy bear, point to it and say, “This teddy bear looks like your teddy bear, doesn’t it?”

WHY?

Young children have trouble connecting a drawing or abstract picture to real things in their lives. Books with real pictures will help your child recognize things in their world more easily and understand the connection from the book.

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together). Click here for the iOS version Click here to download the Android version

Let’s Go for a Walk!

Often, we take all the signs and print around us for granted, but it’s one of the first things your child will start to notice and understand—helping them become a reader!

LET’S GO!

Go for a walk and explore the signs in your neighbourhood.

DO IT TOGETHER!

As you walk, talk with your child about what you see around you. As you pass a sign (road, store, or whatever else you see), point it out and talk about it—what colour is it, what shape, what does it mean.

WHY?

There are signs all around us. From information, to road signs, to advertising. This is called environmental print.

When you talk about signs as you walk, right from when your child is a baby, they will start to understand that the signs have meaning.

These are some of the first things your child will start to notice and “read.”

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together). Click here for the iOS version Click here to download the Android version

 

Bugs on a Branch!

This yummy snack is easy and fun to make together. Pair it with a book or a trip outside to see real bugs to make it more meaningful! WHY? Cooking gives you many ways to talk and build language with your child. Oral language is the foundation upon which reading and writing are built. Having fun together while using language builds a strong foundation for your child to become a reader and a writer! WHAT YOU NEED:

  • Celery (branches)
  • Peanut butter, cream cheese, or processed cheese
  • Raisins, chocolate chips, nuts, or dried cranberries (bugs)

WHAT TO DO:

  1. Cut off the ends and wash and dry the celery. Slice into “branches”
  2. Spread the peanut butter or cheese on the celery
  3. Arrange the bugs along the branch
  • Talk about what you are doing as you do it!
  • Make up a story about how your bugs got on their branches. You could also count your bugs!

DO IT TOGETHER! Depending on their age, your child can help with different parts of the recipe. If you have an older child, they can use a child-safe knife to help cut. Everyone should be able to help with the rest.

OTHER RESOURCES: Mom and Me Cookbook by Annabel Karmel Flit App: To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together). Click here for the iOS version Click here to download the Android version

Colours, Counting, and Matching Fun

Have fun with early numeracy ideas in this game you can make and play together with your preschooler!

WHY?

Numbers are an important part of early math and numeracy and can be found all around us. Counting, sorting, and matching all help with learning math later.

WHAT YOU NEED:

  • Different coloured milk jug lids (or other big lids)
  • Stickers

  

WHAT TO DO:

  1. Choose two lids that are the same colour
  2. Choose two stickers that are the same and put one on each of the lids
  3. Repeat the process until you have used up all of the lids

 

DO IT TOGETHER! Make numbers and math fun by playing different games. You could count the lids, match the lid colours, match the stickers, or flip the lids over so you can’t see the sticker and play a game of memory.

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together). Click here for the iOS version Click here to download the Android version  

The Importance of Play

Parents do not always understand the importance of play, and, in today’s competitive world, the temptation is to have children stop “wasting time” and to put that time to what they believe is more constructive use.

But for a child, there is no more constructive activity than play. Play is so important to optimal child development that it has been recognized by the United Nations High Commission for Human Rights as a right of every child.

What do children learn from play? It allows children to use their creativity while developing their imagination, dexterity, and physical, cognitive, and emotional strength. Play is important to healthy brain development and paves the way for learning. Children who play regularly tend to perform better in mathematics and reading in comparison to those who have fewer opportunities to play.

Play helps children learn about the world in which they live. They can investigate and discover, test their theories, develop spatial relationships, and explore cause and effect, societal roles, and family values in a caring and safe environment.

Play builds self-esteem and social skills. Children will often play at something they know they can do well, at which they can be successful. They will begin with solitary play using inanimate objects like dolls, stuffed animals, trucks, and blocks. Later they will play with other children as they learn to share, negotiate, and cooperate.

Play with parents should not be underestimated as research has shown children whose parents play with them ultimately develop superior social skills. When parents play or join with their children in child-driven play, they are given a unique opportunity to see the world from their children’s vantage point. They learn to communicate more effectively with their children and are given another setting to offer gentle, nurturing guidance.

Play helps with language development. Think of the vast number of words a child uses during play, many of them repeatedly, enhancing their language skills.

Consider the importance of pretend play in stimulating a child’s creativity and imagination. Making a castle in the sand, or a barn out of a shoe box, preparing dinner in their imaginary kitchen or playing dressing up allows children to stretch the limits of their world and experience the fun of make-believe. They are using imagination, storytelling, and problem solving skills that are the foundation of reading, writing, and communication.

Physical play provides various health benefits and promotes early brain development and learning in infants and young children. It helps a child to develop connections between the nerve cells and the brain. As these connections develop, a child’s motor skills, socialization, personal awareness, language, creativity, and problem solving are improved.

Quite simply, play is a cherished part of childhood that inspires fun and laughter and creates a happy family environment in which both children and adults thrive.

Sidewalk Scribbles

Drawing and scribbling lead to writing as your children get older, and sidewalk chalk is a great way to do it! Encourage your children to make scribbles, shapes, pictures, numbers, or letters. Let them tell you about what they have drawn. You could also do your own sidewalk art with letters and numbers so they can see how you do it.

WHY?

Creativity is a bridge to learning, and art and drawing help young children develop early writing skills. Those scribbles and drawings are their first steps to writing. Provide your children with the materials they need to practice becoming a writer. Children are great mimics so make sure they see you writing as well. Then they know it’s important!

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app, (Families Learning and Interacting Together). Click here for the iOS version Click here to download the Android version