Let Your Child Take the Lead

As your child grows, their interests in books will change—follow their lead on what books to choose!

LET’S GO!

Follow your child’s lead!

DO IT TOGETHER!

Have a variety of books for your child to choose from. Make sure the books are accessible by placing them on a lower shelf within reach of your child. Or better still, put them in a basket on the floor. Let them decide which one they want to share with you.

WHY?

Your child’s interests will change over time. They may like different topics, styles, and types of books (fiction or non-fiction) at different stages in their lives.

Frozen Fruits

Making a healthy snack together is fun! You can count pieces of fruit, time how long it takes to freeze, look at the shapes, and more!

LET’S GO!

What you need:

  • 2 cups green seedless grapes
  • 2 cups purple seedless grapes
  • 2 bananas

What to do:

  1. Wash the grapes and cut them lengthwise.
  2. Cut the bananas into slices about 2cm thick.
  3. Put all the fruit on a baking tray and place it in the freezer for at least an hour until it is frozen.

DO IT TOGETHER!

Let your child help you wash the grapes, cut the fruit (using a child-safe knife) and lay the pieces on a baking tray.

Talk about the measurement, and count how many grapes fit into two cups. Count how many pieces of banana you cut. Enjoy a fresh frozen dessert or snack together when it’s ready!

WHY?

Recipes give an opportunity to use reading and numeracy (numbers) in a different way. Talking about measurements, counting, and making something together helps build vocabulary and skills in a way that your child feels very involved with.

The end result, no matter what you’ve made, helps make them want to do it again!

To get over 125 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

Hot Day Relief and Writing – What Could Be Better?

Combining water on a hot day with an opportunity for writing can be great fun!

LET’S GO!

Use the hose and your bodies to create letters or words on a dry fence or wall.

DO IT TOGETHER!

On a nice hot day, get your hose out and have some fun! Find a dry spot on a fence or wall (the wall has to be one that gets darker when water hits it). Have your children and other family members line up in front of the dry area and strike a letter pose by making the shape with their body. You might need two people to make some letters!

Ask everyone to freeze and spray them with the hose, making sure to soak the dry area around their bodies. Once everyone’s nice and wet, have them step away and look at the dry areas left behind.

Have fun with it. Once it’s dry again, challenge yourselves to write a simple word or someone’s name! Give your children a turn with the hose, so they can be the one “writing”.

WHY?

Aside from giving relief on a hot day, writing using different tools and methods will help your children learn to write. Whether it’s making the shape with their body, or outlining someone else’s shape with the hose, they will be able to see what the letters look like and how they are formed. If you try to write words, such as their names, they will start to understand that putting letters together makes something new and meaningful.

To get over 125 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

Painting Patterns

Have fun painting with different-shaped objects that don’t always create the pattern you think they should.

LET’S GO!

What you need:

  • Paper
  • Non-toxic, washable paint – different colours
  • Bowls or plates to hold paint
  • Washbasin (or deep cake pan)
  • Objects that roll or slide (golf ball, rock, marble, pencil, etc.)

What to do:

  1. Put the paper on the bottom of the washbasin.
  2. Put each paint colour into a bowl or on a plate.
  3. Choose an object (like a golf ball) and dip it into the paint.
  4. Place it on the paper in the bottom of the washbasin.
  5. Move the object around by tipping the basin in different directions.

DO IT TOGETHER!

Look around outside and in your house for objects that your child thinks have fun shapes or designs. Let them try each object one at a time in the washbasin. Talk about their painting and the patterns left by the paint.

Does the pattern match the shape of the object or the pattern you thought it would leave in the paint? Follow your child’s lead and experiment by putting more than one object in at a time, or different coloured paints on the same object.

WHY?

Numeracy isn’t just about numbers. Talking about colours, shapes, and patterns helps with your child’s numeracy development. Experimenting and having fun at the same time will help your child learn and remember these numeracy ideas even more.

To get over 125 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

Life Sized Alphabet

Can you and your child make the letters of the alphabet with your bodies? Try numbers and shapes too!

LET’S GO!

Use your whole body to make letters of the alphabet.

DO IT TOGETHER!

Go outside or find some space in your home and make the letters of the alphabet by posing with your child. Explore which letters they can make on their own and which ones they need you to be part of to make it work. Try it laying down or standing up.

Involve other members of your family or friends and add the challenge of singing the ABCs while making the letters with your body.

What to do:

  1. Put two people in each group.
  2. Go around and have each group make the next letter in the song with their bodies (first group does “A,” second group “B,” and so on).
  3. See how fast you can get going without making a mistake.

WHY?

This is another way to explore the shape of letters with your child. Connecting the letters with big body movements will help them remember what the letter looks like and can help them when they are trying to write letters.

 

Satisfying Smoothies

With your child, experiment with this snack to try to make it the yummiest!

LET’S GO!

What you need: 

  • 1 cup milk
  • 3/4 cup yogurt (flavoured or plain)
  • 1/4 cup orange juice
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen berries (strawberries, raspberries, or blueberries)
  • 4 ice cubes (if not using frozen berries)
  • Squeeze of honey (optional to sweeten)

What to do: 

  1. Put all the ingredients into a blender and mix until smooth.

DO IT TOGETHER!

Let your child help you measure, mix the ingredients, and push the buttons on the blender. Show them the recipe and talk about how you know how much you need of each ingredient.

Play with this recipe by adding your child’s favourite fruits, yogurt, or juice to create something different.

WHY? 

Cooking together gives you a chance to have some great conversations with your child. There will be new words, ideas, and fun along the way while you make something together.

By experimenting with the recipe, your child will learn how to start thinking differently, even critically, as they taste and decide how to improve their creation.

To get over 125 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

 

Searching for Signs

Doing this scavenger hunt will give you a chance to talk with your child about the print they see every time you go outside!

LET’S GO!

Go for a scavenger hunt—walk and look for signs.

DO IT TOGETHER!

When you go for a walk with your child, decide together what to look for along the way. It might be stop signs or signs with a picture of a truck on them—whatever your child is interested in looking for.

When you find the signs, talk about what you see. You can extend the activity when you get home by drawing pictures of what you saw on your scavenger hunt.

WHY?

This game helps your child notice the signs around them and gives you a chance to talk about what they mean. It will help your child understand that signs and the writing on them have meaning—one of the first steps in becoming a reader.

To get over 125 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

 

Learning About Bugs

For the bug lovers out there, this book has amazing pictures that will make your child want to explore and learn more!

LET’S GO!

Share an information or non-fiction book together, like Incredible Insects by playBac Publishing or Insects by Dr. George C. McGavin.

DO IT TOGETHER!

Sit with your child and let them flip through the book to see which insects capture their attention.

Read them the information about the ones they want to look at or ones that you have seen around where you live.

WHY?

If your child is an insect lover, these books are great to share with them. The pictures let your child get up close to insects and give good information about each one. 

Your child will want to know how you know so much about the insects, and you can point out the words you are reading.

They may start pointing at words and asking about them. Their interest in insects will keep them engaged with the book and help them become readers!

To get over 125 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

 

What Time is it Mr. Wolf?

Mr. Wolf introduces the idea of time and counting in this fun game!

LET’S GO!

What to do:

  1. Decide which player is going to be the wolf.
  2. All the other players line up in front of the wolf (have lots of space between the wolf and other players).
  3. The wolf turns around so his back is to the other players, and all the players ask together “What time is it Mr. Wolf?”
  4. The wolf picks a time and the players have to take that many steps (e.g. 2:00 is 2 steps).
  5. This repeats until the wolf thinks (without looking) that the players are close enough to catch, and yells “lunchtime!”
  6. The wolf chases the other players and tries to touch as many as he can. One of the players caught becomes the wolf for the next round.

DO IT TOGETHER

Before the game, tell your children that when the wolf says the time, it’s like reading it on a clock. 

To start, you should be the wolf so your children see how the game is played.

When you are calling times, say how many steps that means until everyone understands. When it’s “lunchtime,” turn the catching into some tickling fun.

WHY?

This game helps introduce children to the idea of time.

They won’t understand it all, but it’s good for them to hear the words used to tell time.

Counting and time are both important numeracy skills needed in life.

To get over 120 of the best activities to do with your children to boost and build key literacy skills from birth to 5 years, download the Centre for Family Literacy’s FREE Flit app (Families Learning and Interacting Together).

Click here for the iOS version.

Click here to download the Android version.

Thank You to Our Volunteers!

“Why are you doing this when you’re not getting paid?”

The adult learner this volunteer was working with couldn’t believe his tutor would show up week after week purely to help him reach his employment goals, without asking for anything in return.

“What motivates you to volunteer with us?”

If you want to be inspired, put this question to a volunteer. Then watch them light up. It’s inspiring to hear the passion in their voices as they talk about making a difference, giving back, and their desire to see individuals and families succeed. They also speak about the deep satisfaction they receive from helping others to reach their goals—whether that’s helping a parent to gain new skills as their child’s first teacher, understanding the letters coming home from their child’s school, passing their driver’s test, deciphering a medicine label, or simply gaining the confidence and skills to fill in important forms for themselves.

Our volunteers’ behind-the-scenes commitments typically include board and committee work, assisting with Family Literacy programs, facilitating Adult Literacy Classes, tutoring one-on-one, office support and fundraising events. Their collective impact is extraordinary! Activities are temporarily limited to our distance learning and online programs and communication during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We would like to take this moment to express our gratitude to our volunteers. Together we are working to foster a healthy, literate society where we are all able to contribute and succeed.

Following are some of the responses to our “Why I Volunteer” survey:

It’s the greatest feeling ever to give back in any way I can – and I love seeing the difference the programs the Centre runs makes in our community!
I volunteer because I like to offer my skills to organizations, I want to help my community and because it’s a chance to meet new people.
I love my students and I love their happiness when they know they have learnt something new. They always want to “use” it right away. I also like the people I work with and the atmosphere at the Centre for Family Literacy.
To give back to my community while making new friends.
I wanted to help other families and their children.
I volunteer because I get more back than I give. It fills me up.
I want to help however I can.
I volunteer because I have a deep empathy for the female newcomers who come here and watch their families integrate through their school and work. Left alone for much of the day they feel like they are losing their families to this new world and culture while they sit in loneliness and fear, unable to connect.
The Centre for Family literacy helps people enjoy a better life with dignity and respect.
To meet amazing people in my community and make life a little bit easier for some of them.
To give back to my community and connect with others!
I have been fortunate to have a good job and opportunities to learn. Volunteering is my way of giving back.
I have been a participant with my child in CFL programs for years and wanted to give back.
Because if I don’t who will, and it needs to happen.
For the enjoyment and reward of helping others.
Because I like helping people make a difference in their lives.
Volunteering is good for a community, and it’s a great way to meet people and develop new skills.
It’s fun (though I’ve been away and haven’t volunteered for some time).
I volunteer because giving back teaches me so much more!
Volunteering makes me feel grateful for what I have and provides an opportunity to help improve the lives of the people I touch.
I love to teach and I want to give back to my community.
I enjoy sharing my passions with others.
I volunteer at the Centre because I believe in their Mission Statement and I feel welcomed by the wonderful people who work there.

If you are interested in volunteering to help someone with their literacy skills via online distance learning, click here.