How does Rhymes that Bind Support Literacy Development?

RTB-Blog2

The early literacy skills of children do not begin with reading and writing. The skills they need prior to reading and writing are listening, speaking, and understanding. All of these skills are practiced in the Rhymes that Bind program.

Rhymes are fun, and because of their simplicity, they can be done anywhere. The benefits are many. When hearing nursery rhymes, children hear how sounds are put together—vowels and consonants making words. They hear patterns in speech, pitch, volume, voice inflection, and a general rhythm to language. The sound is different when asking a question, telling a story, giving instructions, or singing a song. Children will hear words they don’t hear every day—in rhymes with animals, submarines, grandfather clocks, and food,  such as:

  • The grandfather clock goes, tick tock tick tock tick tock (slowly sway child back and forth)
  • The kitchen clock goes tictoctictoctictoctictoc (sway child faster)
  • And mommy’s little watch goes ticcaticcaticcaticcaticca (tickle tickle tickle)

Nursery rhymes are like stories with a fun rhythm. They are short and repetitive, and often have a beginning, middle, and end. This helps build memory skills for children when they are able to recall and retell a favourite rhyme, such as:

  • Three Little Pigs
  • Three Little Bears

Nursery rhymes often include early numeracy skills, using numbers to count forward and backward, such as:

  • 5 Green and Speckled Frogs
  • Zoom, Zoom
  • 10 In The Bed

Rhymes can also introduce children to some simple literacy rules without obvious intention, such as:

Alliteration:

  • Peter Piper Picked a Peck of Pickled Peppers
  • She Sells Sea Shells by the Sea Shore

Onomatopoeia:

  • Old MacDonald’s Farm
  • Baa Baa Black sheep

10 reasons to enjoy sharing nursery rhymes with your children:

  1. When babies hear language it increases their comprehension or understanding; as a child’s vocabulary increases, so does their comprehension. Often present in nursery rhymes are words we don’t usually use in everyday conversation with small children
  2. Children attempt to duplicate the sounds they hear while practicing language. This is how their speech is developed. Babies who are read to will often hold a book and make babbling noises that represent reading aloud
  3. Older children will begin to rhyme nonsense sounds and words as they become better at speaking. If they have been exposed to nursery rhymes early, they have already begun to understand the rhythm and flow of language
  4. Babies develop speech by strengthening their mouth and tongue muscles when replicating the sounds they hear in a nursery rhyme
  5. Listening to stories, whether told or read from books, helps children understand that all stories have a beginning, a middle, and an end. As children gain verbal skills they will begin to tell their own stories. Many nursery rhymes are repetitive in nature, and often tell a little story
  6. Children will struggle later when learning how to write a story if they do not first learn how to tell a story
  7. Many nursery rhymes help with physical development in children. While rhyming,  some activities that develop fine motor skills are clapping, counting with fingers, and making simple gestures
  8. Large motor skills can also be developed while singing a rhyme when children are hopping, rolling, walking, and using their whole body in dramatic play
  9. Many rhymes involve touching and tickling your children. By touching, tickling, and laughing together, your bonds are strengthened, which increases learning capacity in children
  10. It is FUN!

If you would like more information about the Rhymes that Bind program or the program schedule, please check the Centre for Family Literacy website: http://www.famlit.ca/programs_and_projects/programs/rhymes.shtml

Learning About Colours

There are many things you can do to help your child learn about different concepts, such as reading books, making crafts, and singing songs. One of the concepts your child will need to learn is colours.

Read Books

The Day the Crayons QuitIn the Alberta Prairie C.O.W. (Classroom on Wheels) program, we like to share a book called The Day the Crayons Quit, written by Drew Daywalt and illustrated by Oliver Jeffers. In addition to learning about colours, this book can help your child understand their own emotions, as well as help to develop their empathy skills.

“Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: His crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking – each believes he is the true color of the sun. What can Duncan possibly do to appease all the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?”

Make Crafts

Here are some activities you can pair with this book:

Dear Crayon craft1.  Use a box of crayons to extend the story. As you read each crayon’s letter, ask your child to take that colour of crayon out of the box. What can they draw with it?

2.  Ask your child how they think each crayon was feeling when they wrote their letter. Use a large index card to write back to one of the crayons in the story. Draw and colour in the crayon that you are addressing, and tell your crayon why they should not quit. Make one for as many colours as you like!

3.  Make your own crayon box.

Materials:

•  Crayons
•  Markers
•  Pencil
•  Glue
•  Scissors
•  One sheet of yellow cardstock (8.5” X 11”)

Crayon Craft x 2Instructions:

  1. Draw and colour your own paper crayons (or use different colours of construction paper) and cut them out.
  2. Fold the yellow cardstock sheet in half and crease it.
  3. Open it up, and with your pencil, draw the opening of the box (a half circle) on the left-hand side of the sheet, making sure to leave about ¼” on either side.
  4. Cut out the opening, fold it back in place, and glue only the edges, so that you are still able to fit your paper crayons inside the “box”.
  5. Decorate your crayon box with crayons or markers!

 

 

Sing Songs

Teaching Mama” has some great resources, including “10 Preschool Songs About Colors.” One of my favourites is “Pass the Colour,” in the tune of “Row, Row, Row Your Boat:”

Sit in a circle and pass a crayon around, singing the song until the following verse is done. Then yell out the crayon’s colour! Continue with as many crayons as you like.

Pass, pass, pass the colour,
This is the game we play.
When the little song is through,
The colour name we’ll say.
(YELLOW!)

For more craft ideas and book recommendations, check out the Centre for Family Literacy webpage: Resources for Parents

 

Numeracy can be fun… for Everyone!

mother-and-child-baking

All children are unique individuals. They all act, play, and express themselves differently. As parents, we quickly discover our children’s preferences in all things. We also generally try to accommodate these preferences – preparing our children’s favourite foods, reading their favourite stories, or getting them clothing in their favourite colours or styles. Children even learn in different ways, for instance they can be:

  • Hands on learners
  • Visual learners
  • Auditory learners

Below is a list of activities that appeal to a wide variety of learning styles. There is no need to set aside time in your busy day to sit with paper and a pencil. Find what works best for your children and remember that the best opportunities for learning are the ones that are fun and occur naturally.

Sing!

If your children love to sing and dance, here are some great songs to share. These songs are not only fun, but they support the numeracy concepts of number sense and counting. Once your children have learned these songs, try making up your own!

  • 5 Green and Speckled Frogs
  • Ten in the Bed
  • 5 Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed
  • 5 Little Ducks

Get Creative!

If your children have an artistic interest, let them create! Provide them with a variety of items to use in their creations. To support the concept of early numeracy, let your children explore colours, textures, shapes and sizes. Here are some ideas to inspire your little artists to create some fun art.

  • Choose a number and draw it on a piece of art paper. Have your children glue that number of items on the page.
  • Have your children choose their favourite colour and draw all the things they can think of that are that colour. Choose a new colour each day.
  • Collect items from nature to use in a collage. While creating the collage, discuss the shapes of the items, which items are bigger and which are smaller, and which are smooth, bumpy or rough.

Play With Your Food!

Cooking and baking with your children are perfect opportunities to explore early numeracy in a variety of ways, such as:

  • Following a list of instructions: what do you add first, second, etc.
  • Measuring ingredients: fill it full, use half, add 2 spoonfuls, etc.
  • Timing: bake for 25 minutes, mix for 2 minutes, etc.

Measure It!

Hand your children a ruler, a stick, or even their shoe and let them measure items around the house or outside. How many shoe lengths is the kitchen table? How many stick lengths is your bed? Is the bed longer than the table or shorter?

Game On!

Board and card games are wonderful opportunities to spend time with your family and practice numeracy skills. Rolling the dice, moving spaces along a game board, and following directions are just a few of the numeracy concepts supported by playing games.

Don’t feel the need to go out and purchase a board game if you don’t already have one. There are many games that you can play as a family that do not require any materials at all.

  • I Spy: focussing on colours, shapes and textures in your search
  • Scavenger Hunt: let your children choose the items to go searching for
  • Simon Says: Take turns being Simon, giving commands such as Simon says jump forward, Simon says spin 3 times, Simon says move fast

Once Upon a Time

Most children love to read or be read to. Sharing stories is a perfect opportunity to explore numeracy with your child.

  • Count items on the page
  • Find all the circles, squares, or triangles in the drawings
  • List all the colours you see
  • Predict what will happen next in the story

Opportunities to support your children’s early numeracy exist in the everyday activities that you are already doing! For more ideas on how to explore these learning opportunities visit us at 3,2,1, Fun! Tuesday afternoons from 1:00 to 2:30 pm at Brander Gardens Elementary School.

Visit our website for more information about the 3,2,1,Fun! program.

hashtag: #321_Fun

 

 

 

Rhymes that Bind is Growing!

At Rhymes that Bind, we use rhymes and rhythms to help build long-lasting language skills and understanding. The program is free to attend, an hour in length, and we offer a little snack midway. Children from birth to preschool, along with their caregiver, enjoy learning new songs and actions to repeat later in their daily activities.

This fall, our Rhymes that Bind program is growing in Edmonton. Not only by numbers of family participants, but by new site locations as well. We have added four new sites this year. Each of the sites are ready for more families to attend.

RTBmultGEN07 (27)2Two of the new locations are at Castle Downs and Londonderry Libraries. We are also excited to add two new intergenerational programs welcoming seniors (without children) to visit. We affectionately call them Grandmas and Grandpas. These new intergenerational sites are at Shepherd Care Kensington Campus, and at Ottwell Senior Centre. For a complete listing of locations and the schedule, visit our website at http://bit.ly/1dApWpt

Every fall it is so nice to return to our programs, as summer is our longest break. We welcome our returning families, some with their own new additions. We also welcome many new families to the program. It is always heartwarming to see how the children have grown and hear their stories of summer activities and achievements. Already we have friends joining their friends and loving the program.

Here in Edmonton, the weather is always a hot topic. Our seasons bring about drastic changes, and day to day the temperature can vary greatly. Even young children notice the change in the air, their faces and noses getting chilly. Leaves are falling everywhere; take the opportunity to sing a song about the seasonal changes!

This can be sung to the familiar tune of Jingle Bells:

Leaves2Leaves are falling, leaves are falling,
One fell on my nose
Leaves are falling, leaves are falling
One fell on my toes
Leaves are falling, leaves are falling
Falling on my head
Leaves are falling, leaves are falling
Yellow, orange and red

Alternatively, when the snow flies:

Snowflakes falling, snowflakes falling
One fell on my nose
Snowflakes falling, snowflakes falling
One fell on my toes
Snowflakes falling, snowflakes falling
Falling on my head
Snowflakes falling, snowflakes falling
Now its time to sled!

hashtag: #RTB_Edm

Road Trips!

I LOVE road trips with my family! With long weekends such as Thanksgiving coming up, many of us hit the highways to visit relatives or to have mini vacations. I love road trips on my own as well. I just can’t get enough of all the places to learn about – using all of your senses. With children young or old, you can point out all that can be seen with their eyes. From mountains to waterfalls, rivers to forests, prairie lands to farm animals, and wild animals too. Visit historic sites. Learn about our past.

With digital cameras it is easy to allow your children to take as many photographs as they would like (deleting ones that don’t make the final cut won’t disappoint them). You can see the world through their eyes and you may be surprised by how great their photography skills can be. You can also give your children binoculars to help them search the land for scavenger hunt items, or try playing a variety of license plate games while on your road trip!

You can use your ears to hear things you may not hear if you are from a big city! Things such as quiet or animals in the forest. If you stop somewhere for a picnic and for stretching legs and relieving restlessness, you may hear a train travelling nearby. You might hear water rushing down a waterfall if you’re on a mountain escape. You can even hear insects buzzing around in summer; we don’t like them, but they are there! Is that a cow lowing in the background? Talk about farmers harvesting this time of year. There are plenty of tractors such as combines to be heard if you pull off at a rest stop.

How about singing to pass the time away? If you aren’t comfortable with your own voice leading the family choir, how about some family friendly CD’s borrowed from your local library? There is so much more to children’s songs now than there was in the past. One of our favourites is a CD called “Snack Time” by the Bare Naked Ladies. My teenagers will still sing along! For lyrics that mom and dad can laugh at, and a very original version of ABC’s, it is a must have.

Smells! You cannot dismiss the power of your sense of smell. The air smells cleaner, perhaps more crisp as we leave our city homes behind. We can point out smells our children may not be familiar with. There are plenty of smells that accompany any farm, whether grain, livestock or vegetable and fruit. Find some flowers to sniff. Is that a sticky tree? Do trees have a scent?

Hands on! Why can’t a road trip be hands on? Have you ever stopped to see the monument that makes a town special? Plan your breaks for places with something interesting to see, do and learn. Run, play, burn off some energy before the next leg of your trip. Collect post cards and things like kids’ paper menus (the kind kids can draw on if you stop for a restaurant meal), random memorabilia, or maybe a picked flower. I still have a little flower picked by my son almost 10 years ago. It has a story behind it of what lengths he and his dad went through to get that flower back to me. My son drew me a picture to go with the flower that helps tell the story. I will treasure it always.

Back in the car again, hand your child a pencil, maybe some crayons, and a sketchbook. Have them write or draw pictures about what they have learned along the way. It is easy to keep a little box of things needed for creativity in the vehicle. You can also find an assortment of lap trays (which resemble dining trays) to use on your trip. They are perfect for snacks, drawing, puzzles, and more. Prepared ahead of time, scavenger hunts are fun, to check off things as they are found or places discovered.

    

Try this website before you head out on your next Canadian road trip, www.bigthings.ca, there is a list by province of things to see!

To me finding some of these things is reason enough for a trip in the car!

Road Trip Rhymes and Songs

Summertime is filled with fun and adventures!  However, sometimes with kids in the car, getting to the adventure becomes an adventure in itself!  Not all vehicles come equipped with DVD players so what can you do to make traveling bearable?

Before you pull the car over and leave your darling children behind, consider a family rhyme and song time as an option.  Rhymes and songs are a wonderful tool to distract and soothe children (and parents!)  They also promote language development and prepare your child for reading.

Here are some songs and rhymes that you and your family can do while strapped in!

Song: Monday Night The Banjo

(Teaches first letters to words and builds vocabulary)

Monday night the banjo,

Playing on the radio,

I like the radio and I like “L”.

“L” is for Lisa, lovely, lovely Lisa.

All the children adore her

Give her a kiss good night,

(Kiss, kiss) Sleep tight!

(Continue with all children’s names, as well as “Mommy” and “Daddy”, “Grandma”, pets’ names etc).

 

Song: My fingers are starting to wiggle

(To the tune of: The Bear went over the Mountain)

 Great song for learning body parts! Wiggle whatever body part you are singing about.

My fingers are starting to wiggle,

My fingers are starting to wiggle,

My fingers are starting to wiggle,

Around and around and around!

 

My elbows are starting to wiggle,

My elbows starting to wiggle,

My elbows are starting to wiggle,

Around and around and around!

 

Continue with other body parts; let you child suggest some parts.  Silly suggestions:  tongue, nose, ears etc.

 

Rhyme: Cuckoo Clock

(Wonderful counting song!  Count back down with older kids.)

 

Tick, tock, tick, tock,

I’m a little cuckoo clock. (Sway head side to side)

Tick, tock, tick, tock

Now I’ m striking one o’clock!

CUCKOO! (Show 1 with your finger and lean head forward)

(Continue to count as high as you like).

 

Song: Roly Poly

(To the tune of Frère Jacques)

This is a fantastic song for teaching opposites and building vocabulary.

 

Roly poly, roly poly (move your hands in a circle motion over each other)

Up, up, up,  (move hands in an upward motion )

Roly, poly roly poly

Down, down down (move hands in a downward motion)

Roly, poly. roly, poly

Clap, Clap, clap

 

Continue with other opposites:  in-out, fast slow, loud-soft, etc.

 

What are your family’s favorite songs or rhymes for riding in the car?