The Book Report – Comprehension tool or a barrier for young readers?

My son is in grade four this year.  He loves to read – he’s like a sponge soaking up every great book he can get his hands on.

This year, he got to join the school’s book club.  He was so excited, especially since the next book he wanted to read “The Lost Hero” by Rick Riordan was on the list.  He got the book, read it in two weeks and proudly handed it in… at which time he was handed a book report sheet and told he needed to fill it out to get credit for it.

He came home and put it on the table and said “I hate book reports.”  I explained, reluctantly, that if he wanted to be in the book club this was one of the requirements (even though I didn’t know about it before and I don’t think I totally agree with it).  He is actually debating not being in the book club because of this. It doesn’t mean he’ll stop reading, but it really killed the joy of it for him.

So what do we do?  I understand book reports are used as a comprehension tool and to double check that someone has read the book, but what a turn off for the already reluctant reader!  Is it so bad, especially for a “club” if they can just say they read the book (I think it’s a different conversation for book reports that are school assignments, which have multiple ways to do them – reports, posters, building something)?

I’m at a loss.  I think I will be talking to the librarian, but what angle to I take?  Any thoughts out there??

By the way, the “Percy Jackson and the Olympians” series by Rick Riordan is a great read for young and old (my son’s the young and I’m the old).

 

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