Stop and Smell the Roses

Stop and smell the roses? Have you ever wondered what that really means? You’ve probably heard the expression before, maybe even said it yourself. I’ve come to appreciate the phrase in a different way as a parent. I identify it with slowing down and taking a moment to appreciate the simplicity of childhood, how everything can be new, and being grateful for the chance of discovery in the eyes of my child.

Playtime4-smWhile watching little ones play, it may seem like a simple, easy, and carefree life. Far from it! There is so much magic going on in a child’s brain as they explore their world and experience things for the first time—or even the first 15 times. They are developing at an incredibly fast pace and at no other time in their lives will their brains learn at the same rate as it does in the early years.

As a parent it can be easy to worry about whether we are providing our child with enough opportunity and activity. It is easy to get caught up in the parenthood shuffle—so easy that we forget to slow down. Stop. And smell the roses.

Playtime2-smTake the time to let your child play freely as they choose with the materials they want. If your child loves stacking blocks, let them stack and build over and over again. There’s no need to change the activity all the time. If your child prefers to colour, scribble, paint and draw, provide them with the supplies and space they need. If your child prefers collecting cars or miniature figures, and sorts them and puts them all in a line for no apparent reason, let them.

The point is, children need time to do what they love best. It doesn’t matter which activity they love, all are full of learning opportunities. A child will give much more time and attention to an activity they love—that is how they learn best.

Playtime-smWhen I sit back and watch a young child at play, I like to take the time to stop and really watch what they are doing. Are they learning about balance and gravity? Texture and colour? Making sorting rules, counting, adding and subtracting? Like the young scientists they are, they are learning the cause and effect of many things they do. Play really is child’s work, and that work is  important.

So today, I challenge anyone with a child in their life to stop, watch and listen. Maybe you’ll be lucky enough to be invited into their play. Just remind yourself its okay to take the time to stop everything and just enjoy the beauty and wonder of childhood—the same way you might stop in a beautiful garden to enjoy the roses.

For information on FREE programs like the Centre for Family Literacy’s, Learn Together – Grow Together, where parents and their children meet each week to explore and discover many things together, check out our program schedules on our website www.famlit.ca

For ideas on meaningful play with your child, check out Flit, our APP! It’s available for both  Apple and Android devices. For more information, please visit our website www.famlit.ca

 

 

Countdown to Christmas with 3,2,1, Fun!

The countdown to Christmas will be starting soon! Many of us have seen or even used the traditional Advent calendar, which houses a delicious chocolate behind each of the 25 doors leading up to Christmas. Children love these calendars and the excitement that comes with the Christmas countdown. At 3,2,1, Fun! we have compiled a fun list of Advent ideas and Christmas activities to share with you. These ideas combine fun and learning into creative Christmas experiences and potentially new traditions that your children and family will love.

ADVENT CALENDARS

25 Books for Advent

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Unwrap one book a day to read as a family.

Some of our favourite numeracy-themed books to share are:

  • 12 Days of Christmas – Rachel Isodora
  • The Doorbell Rang – Pat Hutchins
  • Bedtime Math – Laura Overdeck
  • Christmas Activities MATHS – Irene Yates
  • A Frog in the Bog – Karma Wilson and Joan Rankin
  • Ten Apples Up On Top – Dr. Seuss

Advent Activity Envelopes

Advent-Envelopes

Choose 25 fun family activities and secure each one in an envelope. Choose one envelope to open each day and enjoy!

Some of the numeracy activity ideas we share in 3,2,1, Fun! are:

  • Baking
  • Holiday theme BINGO
  • Make paper snowflakes and explore their unique shapes
  • Craft Christmas cards or write your wish list
  • Build a snowman
  • Go for a walk and count how many houses are decorated, predict how many Christmas trees you will see, or collect pine cones along the way to turn into Christmas crafts later

 Make Your Own Advent Calendar

AdventCalendar

A fun idea we shared at 3,2,1, Fun! is how to make your own advent calendar using  recycled paper towel tubes, cardboard and craft supplies!

In addition to Advent calendars, there are many fun ways to bring numeracy into your Christmas activities. Some of our favourites at 3,2,1, Fun! are:

  • Wrapping gifts – a fun way for children to utilize their measuring and estimation skills
  • Christmas baking – a delicious way for children to follow a recipe and practice their ordering, number sense, and prediction skills
  • Decorating the house – gives your children the perfect opportunity to use their pattern, shape, and sorting skills
  • Making Christmas wish lists and shopping for gifts – offers a great chance for children to discover counting, money sense, and emergent budgeting skills

We hope you enjoy these Christmas activity ideas from 3,2,1, Fun! Do you have a favourite countdown to Christmas tradition that you’d like to share?

Visit our website for more information about this program.

hashtag: #321_Fun

3,2,1,Fun! The Importance of Beginning Numeracy with Everyday Activities

321 Fun

Who remembers saying “I don’t like math” or “I’m not good at math”? Many adults have negative feelings about math that began early in life.

A positive outlook on numeracy skill building with your children will help them later in life. In fact it can change your outlook as well. You don’t have to be completing complex algebra equations in order to be practicing numeracy skills.

In the 3,2,1, FUN! program offered by the Centre for Family Literacy, comments from parents have reflected some of the initial anxiety they feel towards numeracy and teaching it to their children. One parent stated how she felt math was scary and that she could never teach it to her children. She avoided anything she thought related to math prior to attending the 3,2,1, FUN! numeracy program. Upon finishing the program with her child, she said she now feels much less stress, and is more prepared to positively explore numeracy development with her children; she has a better understanding of the relationship between early numeracy learning and continuing success in school.

The parents and their children meet once a week to learn about the many everyday activities in which we use numeracy skills. When we estimate the cost of groceries, count the days leading up to a special event, follow a recipe, measure material for a sewing or building project, or even give directions, we are using numeracy skills.

These real life situations make numeracy meaningful for children, and are important in helping them build strong numeracy skills for later math learning. Part of our program enlists the parent as the teacher as they work alongside their children, participating in activities that are developmentally appropriate and supportive to the individual children.

Having a good foundation in numeracy means that we have an understanding of numbers, shapes, and measurement, and how they relate to each other. We learn to ask questions, solve problems, and share ideas. This numeracy understanding helps us become better communicators and problem solvers and allows us to participate fully in our communities.

Children benefit when we show them that numeracy is part of our daily lives and we use it all the time. This familiarity with various numeracy concepts, and children’s own experiences with everyday math, will help them become fluent math thinkers. It will prevent anxiety about more formal math learning when they reach school.

If you would like more information about the 3,2,1, FUN! drop-in program, visit the Centre for Family Literacy website. I can guarantee you will have fun with your children exploring numeracy together.

Positive early experiences in mathematics are as critical to child development as are early literacy experiences (Alberta education, 2007).

  

Conversations with Babies

Baby loveThere are behaviours that babies are born with, like reflexes and how they are naturally drawn toward faces, but if you want your baby to grow up into someone who can tell you things and understand the things you tell them, then you need to talk with them.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when you chat with your baby:

  • Babies aren’t very talkative to start, but they are excellent listeners
  • Share your thoughts with your baby, talk about the things you are doing, or tell stories
  • Even before their first words, leave room for them to respond, and reply to their babbles and coos to help them learn about the pattern of conversation
  • Speak and sing to your babies in however many languages you speak. Babies are super good at picking up additional languages if they are learning them from the people in their lives
  • Babies don’t always want to talk. If they look like they’ve had enough, give them a break
  • On the other hand, don’t ignore your baby when they’re trying to talk to you. When you respond, you are letting them know they’re on the right track for developing speech
  • Maintain eye contact and use facial expressions
  • Babies are using cues from your lips and mouth to learn about the sounds coming out of your face. They are simultaneusly learning to lip read!
  • Use expression in your voice, as much as your baby loves you and your voice, there is still such a thing as too boring

An extra note about that last point. You’ve probably noticed that people sound different when they talk to babies. They’ll use a high energy sing-song voice that usually makes babies smile. There are studies that show this helps babies to recognize the differences between different speech sounds, which is pretty cool. You might try to tone it down, but there’s evidence that we all do it on some level.

On another level, it’s one of the many ways that you can show your baby that you are engaging with them personally. You are reinforcing that back and forth communication with your baby is foundational for language development and brain development in general.

What works best for you? Does your baby particularly like entries from your old high school diary, or your celebrity impressions? Let us know in the comments!

You might also be interested in a Books for Babies program offered by the Centre for Family Literacy in Edmonton. Here’s a link to the webpage.