Learning with Literacy Links

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Back in 2012 there was an increase in the number of inquiries the Centre for Family Literacy received from organizations, childcare providers, and parents, about what kind of services we had to offer parents and professionals working with families with children under six years.

Parents were already attending programs that had them singing, sharing stories and books, and interacting with their child and other families in the group. They wanted to know more about why these programs were important.

Early learning and care practitioners saw the difference that bringing these activities into their own programs meant. They wanted to know how they could enhance and build more literacy into their daily activities with the children. They also wanted to know more practical ways to share what they were doing with the parents.

To meet this community need, a number of hands-on practical workshops were developed to address early literacy for parents, practitioners and anyone else interested in supporting literacy in families.

These workshops are offered in a variety of settings: daycares and day home provider agencies, community organizations, and conferences. Participants leave the workshops with information based on research as well as practical, creative, and inexpensive strategies that enhance literacy in everyday life. They also explore the important role the parent/caregiver plays in building and supporting the literacy skills of child and parent alike.

Do you know?

  • Sharing rhymes, songs, books, and stories build language skills
  • Identifying objects by shape, colour, or size are numeracy skills
  • By engaging your child in a book, you increase their enjoyment and comprehension skills
  • Having strong language skills (in any language) is the foundation for learning to read and write
  • By having a variety of writing materials available, you encourage a child to write
  • Playing games, asking questions, and taking turns develops essentials skills
  • Children are reading symbols and signs long before they are reading words
  • Shopping, cooking, and baking are rich with literacy experiences

Check out the list of workshops on the Literacy Links page of our website. If you are interested in attending a workshop or hosting one, please contact us at info@famlit.ca

hashtag: #lit_links

Free Outdoor Fun with 3,2,1, Fun!

LookatClouds

Supporting your child’s numeracy development does not have to cost you anything but time and creativity, especially when you can head outdoors! At 3,2,1, Fun! we have started our spring session by sharing with our families a variety of numeracy activities that are free, support strong numeracy development, and are a ton of FUN!

Cloud search

Find a comfortable spot on the grass and lay down with your child. Take a look at the clouds in the sky. What shapes do you see in the clouds? What do the clouds look like? Are some bigger or smaller than others? Do the clouds tell a story? Do the shapes of the clouds change?

Jump to it!!

This is a fun game to play with your child in your back yard or at the park. Have your child choose a place to stand; this will be their starting position. Next choose a destination for them such as the swing set or the garage. Ask your child how many jumps they think it will take for them to reach the destination. Once they have made their estimate, have them “jump to it!” This activity is not only great exercise and fun, but it also allows your child to practice estimation, measurement, and counting. Try to use different forms of movement; try, for instance, baby steps, skipping, crab walking, etc.

Float or sink, what do you think?

Any activity that involves water is a sure hit with children! Fill up a bucket of water. Collect some natural items like rocks, sticks, and leaves, as well as some of your child’s favourite toys. Have your child predict which items they think will sink in the water and which items they think will float. Then test their predictions. Ask them why some items sink while others float. Support this activity using terms like heavy, light, weight, deep, shallow, etc.

Drop it!

This activity is similar to float or sink. Collect a variety of items that can be safely dropped onto the grass or a blanket outside. Ask your child which items they think will fall to the ground quickly and which will take longer to fall. Let them test their predictions by holding up the objects and dropping them! Discuss with them why some items fall faster than others.

You can make this activity even more challenging and fun for your child if you let them use a small step stool, the back steps, or a step ladder (with your supervision). This variation allows them to explore how different heights change the time it takes for an item to fall.

Scavenger Hunt

You do not need a paper, pen, or a list for a scavenger hunt. Head outside and use nature and your imagination! Use your child’s body as a tool of measurement to have them seek out scavenger items. For example, find something longer than your foot, bigger than your hand, thicker than your finger, or taller than you. You can also use shapes to inspire your search; find something shaped like a circle, triangle, square, etc.

This activity can be done anywhere. The only limit with this activity is your imagination! Have fun and let your child come up with some of the scavenger tasks!

For more ideas on how to support your child’s numeracy development in ways that are both free and fun, please visit us at 3,2,1, FUN! Tuesday afternoons at Callingwood School from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm.

 

Visit our website for information about the 3,2,1,Fun! program.

hashtag: #321_Fun

Rhymes that Bind is . . .

Rhymes that Bind is Engaging

Multicultural Rhymes programs build community; one small community happens on Thursday mornings in Edmonton at the Africa Centre, 13160 -127th Street, Early Learning Room between 11:00 am and 12:00 pm. The group comes together once a week for ten weeks.

(Other Rhymes that Bind programs happen throughout the city. You’ll find the link to our website and the program schedule at the end of this blog.)

Music has a strong cultural component; songs and rhymes are passed down from  generation to generation. We also integrate our regular songs, and rhymes of action, body parts, tickle, and lullabies, with Arabic and French songs.

An Urdu children’s song that we are learning is about an eggplant and a potato! It is a humorous song that the boys in the video below know well and enjoy teaching to the rest of us. It makes them very proud. They have great facial expressions and gestures to accompany the song.

 

We are also learning the French version of Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes.

Rhymes that Bind is Socialization

The program creates a bond between the parents and their children. The children learn the songs together and develop the confidence to take a favourite song home to share with a family member or friend. This allows them to express their independence, and they are so proud of their accomplishment!

Rhymes that Bind is Physical

Children love movement, they delight in it and require it for their well-being. Rhymes that Bind songs involve lots of movement which encourages the growth of fine and gross motor skills.

The all-time favourite is Zoom, Zoom, Zoom! I had a 14-month old little person requesting it on Monday at the Castle Down’s Library location! She comes to the program with her grandmother who is thrilled that her grandchild can make the hand motions.

Zoom, Zoom , Zoom

Zoom, Zoom, Zoom
We are going to the moon,
Zoom, Zoom we are going to the moon.
If you want to take a trip,
Climb aboard my rocket ship
Zoom, Zoom, Zoom we are going to the moon.

(lift your child up in the air like they are taking a trip to the moon)

Rhymes that Bind is Emotional

Rhymes that Bind lullabies are soothing and calming for parents, caregivers and grandparents alike. Lullabies have existed throughout human history and can be a way of promoting a child’s ability to self soothe.

Here is a favourite that uses “I Love You” in different languages.

I Love You!

I love you, I love you
All day long, I sing this little song to you.
I love you, I love you,
Darling I love you!
You can insert, Je ‘taime, Yo Te Amo

Rhymes that Bind is Language

Children are orientated to learning language and Rhymes that Bind is one of the best ways for them to learn it.

Listening skills are developed and strengthened through song. Songs are aural (hearing). Ears are one of the first body parts to fully mature before birth.

Repetition supports brain development; a child’s brain is especially active and wired to receive large amounts of new stimulation. The more often it is repeated the more likely it will be retained. It is natural for a child to go through a developmental phase where they request their favourite song, reciting or singing it over and over without getting bored.

Rhymes that Bind allows children to play with sounds and words while increasing their vocabulary.

Rhyme and rhythm are powerful tools for developing language skills. Rhymes that Bind has it!

Please join us at a Rhymes that Bind program in your community. More information about Rhymes that Bind and our Edmonton program schedule here

hashtag: #RTB_Edm

Scrapbooking Your Way to Essential Skills

What was the last thing you read? Maybe it was a road sign to find your way, or the label on a prescription bottle. When did you last use a computer and why? Was it to update your FaceBook status or to fill out an online insurance claim? What could you learn that would make your life easier, or more interesting? Maybe it’s another language, social media, or how to drive.

Reading, computer use, and continuous learning are just a few of the basic skills needed in our daily lives and we don’t often think about them. They’re called the 9 Essential Skills and they include:

  1. Reading
  2. Document use
  3. Writing
  4. Numeracy
  5. Oral Communication
  6. Thinking Skills
  7. Working with Others
  8. Digital Technology
  9. Continuous Learning

These skills are seen as “building blocks” because they are the starting point for all future learning. These “starter skills” are needed whether we are baking a cake at home or balancing a budget at work, so it’s easy to see how important it is to develop them in our children, and for adults to keep them fresh. One way adults can do this is by incorporating family literacy activities into the daily lives of their families.

Making a scrapbook is a great way for the whole family to target those essential skills. On the Alberta Prairie C.O.W. Bus, we have a very simple example of a scrapbook. There are many different types, and they can be as simple or as elaborate as you want. This activity potentially uses all 9 essential skills, so periodically take time to review your creation and talk about what you have learned.

A scrapbook is fun for kids to work on. They love to see themselves in pictures and hear their own stories. The finished product is a great learning tool for the kids, and what you put in the scrapbook can be a record of your other family literacy activities.

Materials Needed:

  • Small photo album
  • Family photos
  • Flash cards
  • Pens
  • Stickers for decoration

Directions:

Choose photos (eg. family vacation). Insert into a sleeve.

ScrapbookOn a flashcard, write a simple sentence that corresponds with the photo. Insert it into the opposing sleeve.

Create a book cover using another flashcard. Insert into front sleeve.

Try letting them narrate their own story while you act as the scribe. If you make new books each week, month or year, you will see how their skills progress over time.

Scrapbook2Why not share a learning activity with your family today? Don’t forget to snap some photos, or keep souvenirs, for your scrapbook!

Learn more about Essential Skills here

Alberta Prairie C.O.W. Bus information and schedule

hashtag: #ab_cow

 

 

 

 

 

The C.O.W. has Mice & Pretty Bugs in May!

Mouse_CountMay is full of mice on the bus. First we will be reading Mouse Count. In this charming companion to Mouse Paint, Ellen Stoll Walsh introduces the concept of counting forward and backward in a suspenseful story that will keep young readers guessing. We have some furry little props to add to this exciting story.

 

Lunch

Lunch is also on the bus this month. It’s time for lunch, and one little mouse is famished! In fact, he’s so hungry that once he starts eating, he can’t stop. He sinks his teeth into a crisp white turnip, gobbles up some orange carrots, devours an ear of yellow corn, and then tosses back some tender green peas. He’s full, but this mouse keeps on munching until his bulging belly won’t hold another bite. Come and see all the stuff author Denise Fleming has this little mouse devouring!

 

Butterflys2Still on the fun theme, we will be singing B.I.N.G.O. on the bus. We have some new puzzles and activities like “Who Knows Whose Nose,” and some giant bugs that snap together. We also welcome a kaleidoscope of beautiful butterflies in the bus this month. Join us for some great stories, fun activities, and pretty bugs!

You’ll find our Edmonton bus schedule here

hashtag: #edm_cow