Baby’s Favourite Book

(0 – 6 months)

Did you know your baby can have a favourite book? Long before they can talk or read, and even before they can turn the pages, babies will show a preference for certain books. And what they like best might surprise you.

We like all different kinds of books as adults; they might put us inside an adventure or romance, they might help us put our lawnmower back together, or maybe they help us feel a part of something bigger than ourselves. Young babies, on the other hand, they like pictures of faces.

Yep, almost as much as they like to stare up into your eyes, a book with nice big photos (not drawings) of faces will hold a baby’s attention for sometimes minutes at a time. Baby can’t see very far away, so hold the book roughly 12 inches away from them while you cuddle or play on the floor.

The book won’t do all of the work for you. These books typically have little to nothing to read in them, and what’s written is not very exciting. So, instead of reading to your baby, play with the book and your baby, talk about the pictures, and have some goofy fun. Watch and listen for your baby’s reaction, she will tell you what she likes, and when she’s had enough.

One of my favourite books of this type is What’s On My Head! by Margaret Miller. The photos are clear and not too busy. It’s a good size for when babies begin to hold things. And, it’s silly:

• Does the baby like her hat?

• Who wrapped this little girl up like a present?

• Why is there a duck on that baby’s head?

This book raises a lot of questions and doesn’t offer many answers. Still, it is fun to explore with your baby for at least as long as his little attention span holds out.

Books for Babies Edmonton program schedule:

hashtag: #books_for_babies

Learn Together, Grow Together

LTGT-webLast week was the start to our latest 10-week session of Learn Together, Grow Together. The program is for parents and caregivers and their children ages 3 to 6 years old. While the adults learn about their children’s early learning, and how to support literacy development and success in school, it is also a good opportunity for the parents to brush up on their own literacy skills and connect with other parents of preschool children.

We begin each session with stories and singing, followed by gym time. Afterwards, we split the children and parents into separate learning groups, and finally, we bring them back together for fun parent-child learning activities.

During parent time for the next few weeks, we will explore “emergent literacy.” Emergent literacy is “the knowledge children have about reading and writing before they can actually read and write.”(http://www.kidsability.ca/en/LiteracyHandouts) We will encourage parents in their role as emergent literacy teachers for their own children.

How does a child gain this knowledge about reading and writing? What are some strategies parents can use to foster emergent literacy in their child?

Here are a few ideas to try together with your family:

  • Talk with your child. Your child will learn so much from positive language interactions with you.
    • Talk about what you see in a picture book, while at the grocery store, at the park, etc.
    • Explain to your child what you are doing, while you are doing it. For example, if you make cookies, talk about the different ingredients and what steps you have to take, or if you are paying bills, use the time to talk to your child about money and numbers.
    • Play card and board games together. Turn off the electronic devices and have fun playing a game where there is opportunity to speak with each other.
  • Sing and rhyme with your child. Sing songs and rhymes together as they provide opportunities to bond with your child as well as expand their vocabulary. You can always make up your own songs and rhymes too – your child will enjoy hearing your voice either way.
  • Visit your local library and take advantage of their book lending services.
  • Follow you child’s lead in their interests. For example, if they have an interest in animals, share books about animals, sing songs and rhymes about animals, and play games about animals. If you can, take a trip to a pet store, a farm, or a zoo; take the time to talk about everything you see and experience together.
  • Model positive literacy behaviours to your child. If your child sees your enjoyment of reading the newspaper, writing a shopping list, talking about the road signs you see, etc., they will think of these literacy activities as positive experiences.

Parents have such an important role in cultivating the knowledge of reading and writing in their child, even before they are actually about to read and write. There are so many opportunities to promote emergent literacy in a small child, simply by intentionally interacting with them and involving them in what you are already doing!

 

More about the Learn Together – Grow Together program

hashtag: #LT_GT

 

Learning to Play!

Play3

When was the last time you played? As children, we played all the time; that was our job! Unfortunately, the older we get the less we play. And even though we have children who are playing constantly, we feel that we need to assume the role of parents instead of playmates. As parents, we are our children’s first and best teachers and playmates. We are the ones they love spending time with, getting dirty with, learning with, and having fun with!

Play is the best vehicle for helping our children to learn, develop and practice an incredible number of skills:

  • Social skills – through sharing, taking turns, negotiating, leading, and compromising
  • Physical skills – by using both fine and large muscles
  • Language, literacy and numeracy skills – through having conversations, playing games and having hands-on experiences
  • Self-esteem – by demonstrating successes and abilities
  • Becoming more independent – by making their own decisions
  • Cooperating, problem solving, and working with others

Through play, children are learning about their world; they are exploring, dreaming, imagining, and creating. The best way for parents to support this learning is by simply joining in their children’s play.

  • Observe – watch how your children play. Seeing which activities are their favourites, and learning what skills they excel at and what needs work. Identifying the goals they set for themselves.
  • Engage – jump in and join them in play! Now that you have been observing their interests, try supporting them and engaging with them in what they love to do. Follow their lead!
  • Be creative – there are no right ways, or right times, for play. There are no correct ways for using toys. Everything and anything can be objects of learning and fun. Use your imagination!

As parents, we often have so many demands in a day that incorporating ourselves into play can seem challenging. Below is a list of routine family activities and ideas for bringing play into them.

Grocery Shopping:

  • Help your children create a grocery list using pictures cut out of flyers, then challenging them to find all the ingredients on their list before you complete yours.
  • Let your children do the navigating of the cart. Let them drive! This is the perfect opportunity for playing with numeracy. Support this activity by using words like: right, left, near, far, up, down, fast, slow, stop, go etc.
  • If your children are riding in the cart, together try building a tower or a castle with the items in the cart. See how tall or how wide you can build it, and how many different shapes you can use.

Preparing for dinner:

  • Play with the process of measuring, pouring, and mixing! Get messy!
  • Challenge your children to a race! Who can set the table the fastest?
  • Play a guessing game! How many plates do we need for everyone? What shape are the napkins? What colours are on the table?
  • Picnic! Turning any meal or snack into fun and play is easy when you do it picnic style. Try using your back yard, deck or living room. Planning the picnic together with your children, decide where you will go, and who you will invite. Use your imaginations; it can be a picnic on Mars!

Commuting:

  • Play “I Spy” or other games involving things you see such as colours of cars or shapes of street signs.
  • Count the number of turns you are taking.
  • What songs do they know? Try making up a new song.

Bath Time:

  • Make bath time more playful by adding coloured ice-cube icebergs to their bath water!
  • Try tossing a bunch of glow sticks in the tub and turning out the lights!

Go Outside:

  • Every single trip outside can be a playful adventure if you use your imagination.
  • Take a walk and collect ‘treasures’ along the way.
  • When you take the garbage out, count how many steps it takes to get to the curb and how many it takes to get back.
  • Find some puddles and jump in! If there are no puddles, make your own!

Children want to see their parents having fun. They want to see us being silly, laughing, and getting dirty! More than anything, our children want to share these experiences with us. As parents we focus on sharing our world with our children. Let’s start focusing on letting our children share their world with us!!

 

Visit our website for information about the 3,2,1,Fun! program.

hashtag: #321_Fun

Making Sense of Babbling

Baby-babble

Playing with language is something that babies from all cultures, and from all languages, experiment with naturally. Many of the little rhymes we sing to children, remembered from our own childhoods or learned new, don’t appear to make sense. They can sound like baby babble.

Although the actual words may not make sense, using different muscles while forming new sounds is all very important to building early language skills. Understanding communication between people is also happening regardless of the noise the baby makes. When you say something to your baby, and your body language reflects an open, caring and loving feeling, your baby will respond by trying to mimic your sounds and also your body language.

Here is a rhyme that always reminds me exactly of babies babbling:

Ah ram sam sam, ah ram sam sam
Goolie goolie goolie goolie goolie
Ram sam sam

Ah ram sam sam, ah ram sam sam
Goolie goolie goolie goolie goolie
Ram sam sam

Ah raffie, ah raffie
Goolie goolie goolie goolie goolie
Ram sam sam

For actions to this rhyme, you can try patting your hands on your lap for each ram sam sam, making circle motions with your hands moving around each other for each goolie goolie, and raising your hands in the air for raffie raffie.

Those are all simple motions for small ones to copy. You can make your own movements for any rhyme, just be consistent – your baby will be following along with you.

As a Rhymes that Bind program facilitator, it is very rewarding to see children and their parents building this relationship through the earliest stages of communication. The parents not only experience it first hand, but also by witnessing the other parents and babies in the room who are enjoying the experience.

Building language is powerful and hard work. The next time you hear your baby babbling, take a moment to listen to the different sounds they are trying to recreate. Those are sounds they hear throughout the day. When your child is facing you and you are speaking to them, keep in mind the more animated you look and sound, the longer you will keep their attention. Your child adores you as much as you adore them. They love the sound of the voices they recognize most. Take the opportunity to be silly and play with sounds with your baby. Congratulate yourself for supporting and encouraging your babies’ first sounds that will eventually become their first words!

 

Find more information about Rhymes that Bind and our Edmonton program schedule here

hashtag: #RTB_Edm