2 Easter Egg-tivities, a Song and a Book

“See the bunnies sleeping, ‘til it’s nearly noon
Shall we awake them with a merry tune
Oh so still. Are the bunnies ill? Shhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh,
Wake up little bunnies, hop, hop, hop!
Wake up little bunnies, hop, hop, hop!
Wake up little bunnies, hop, hop, hop and GO!”

Usually we end this song with “stop” so our little bunnies will pretend to go back to sleep for another round of the song. For Easter, it’s only fitting that we use this song as is to start the morning or the egg hunt. If your kids are anything like mine at Easter, you probably don’t have to wake them up!

Easter for us means a family get-together, good food, and many different activities. Colouring eggs is a big part of our traditions, but we like to try something new each year – sometimes it doesn’t even involve dye!

“Mod Podge Egg” was a hit last year, providing many opportunities to talk about colours and shapes, and to just have fun.

mod-podge

Mod Podge Egg

You need:

  • Egg (boiled, or blown out if you want to keep it)
  • Tissue paper (many colours)
  • Mod Podge (a sealer – like glue, but it hardens and keeps the egg strong)
  • Paint brush

 What to do:

  1. Tear or cut up the tissue paper into different shapes and sizes.
  2. Spread Mod Podge on the egg and put tissue paper all over.
  3. Spread another layer of Mod Podge over the tissue paper on the egg, and add more tissue paper until you’re happy.
  4. Add one last layer of Mod Podge to seal it completely.

Another Easter favourite for our family is the great Easter Egg hunt. It gets more complicated every year, and sometimes we like to add a little variety to what the Easter Bunny brings.

One year we made “goldfish carrots.” The kids had so much fun pulling them out of our pretend garden.

carrots

Goldfish Carrots

You need:

  • Goldfish crackers (or something else orange)
  • Clear disposable icing bags (not cut)
  • Green ribbon

What to do:

  1. Fill the icing bag with the goldfish so the pointy end is down.
  2. Tie the ribbon around the top of the bag when you get the size of carrot you want.
  3. Hide them in a houseplant or make your own “garden”.

Finally, what is Easter without a good book? For some bunny-themed books, scroll down to Darren Hinger’s blog, “Babies Touching Books… with Bunnies.” A great Easter themed book is Duck and Goose: Here comes the Easter Bunny by Tad Hill. It’s about two little birds trying to find a hiding place so they can see the Easter Bunny. It’s perfect for bedtime the night before the big day.

There are many fun Easter activities. Does your family have Easter traditions you would like to share? We would love to hear about them!

 

Parent Literacy Workshops in Your Community

COW-workshopThe Alberta Prairie C.O.W. Bus is known to travel around the province, taking part in planned events in communities as a way of promoting family literacy. But did you know that, at the invitation of our community partners, the Classroom On Wheels facilitators also hold indoor workshops for parents and caregivers?

The workshops are held in a welcoming space other than the bus, last about an hour and a half, and are for adults only. We require that the hosting organization supply childcare so that parents and caregivers can fully participate.

At these workshops we discuss a variety of early literacy topics:

  • What is family literacy and why is it important
  • How early literacy leads to the essential skills we use in everyday life
  • Building literacy with reading, telling stories, singing, sharing rhymes and playing games
  • Simple, inexpensive ideas for activities that can be made at home
  • How to incorporate literacy into everyday life
  • How to choose quality books; book safety
  • Using crafts to extend your rhymes and stories. If there’s time, we will even break into groups for some hands-on practice
  • Everyone will take home a list of rhymes to enjoy

At the end of the workshop, attendees will also take home a quality children’s book of their choosing.

To arrange a Parent Workshop for your organization, please contact our Classroom on Wheels Coordinator by calling the Centre for Family Literacy at 780.421.7323.

Alberta Prairie C.O.W. Bus information and schedule

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“Stuck” on the C.O.W. Bus

The C.O.W. Bus is ready for Spring! We have new puzzles and literacy activities as we do at the start of every month.

To celebrate the big thaw, we are reading some great stories. Wiggle Waggle by Jonathan London is a fun favourite. Everyone can jump up and dance along with camels, horses, and kangaroos in their lively animal parade.

We use great characters made of felt to help tell the story Stuck by Oliver Jeffers. Delightful chaos ensues when a young boy gets his kite stuck in a tree. He throws up his shoe to shift it, but that gets stuck too. So he throws up his other shoe and that gets stuck, along with…a ladder, a pot of paint, the kitchen sink, an orangutan and a whale, among other things! This is a hilarious book with a wonderful surprise ending.

For Easter we will have some fun stories to share about this bright and “hoppy” holiday.  To help you celebrate here are some quick tricks for dying eggs. http://www.kidspot.com.au/Easter-Crafts-Quick-tricks-to-dye-eggs-for-Easter+4566+162+article.htm

Peanut Butter and Jelly will be everyone’s favourite song (and sandwich) when we sing this sweet little ditty on the bus. Below is a link to this catchy tune. http://youtu.be/EpPRpSi8Czk

 

Check our website for the bus schedule and more information

Watch a video of a program on the bus

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Babies Touching Books… with Bunnies

family with baby read book 2

When I first started facilitating the Books for Babies program, I was struck by the thought, “Wow, there are a lot of board books about bunnies.” And if the combination of books, babies, and bunnies rings any bells for you, there is a good chance you’re thinking of Dorothy Kunhardt’s Pat the Bunny, which has been in print since 1940 and is one of the best selling children’s books of all time.

Pat-the-BunnyPat the Bunny was actually one of the first interactive books for children. Instead of telling a story, it is more of a collection of things you can do with your toddler. You can try on mommy’s ring by putting your finger through a hole in the page, look into a mirror, flip through a smaller book inside the book, and of course, pat the bunny’s (fake) fur. This also makes it one of the first “touch and feel” books.

Fast-forward 75 years and there are a lot of touch and feel books for children, and a lot of them feature bunnies. I won’t try to explain all the bunnies, but there are good reasons why these interactive touch and feel books are so popular with babies, toddlers, and preschoolers.

Bunny_book1.  Babies and toddlers are busy exploring and learning about the world around them, and many things are not as smooth as the pages of a book. The added dimension of texture in a touch and feel book helps our little ones connect what they are seeing in the book with things they have discovered around the house, or on any trips you have taken together outside the home. Babies around 4 – 6 months old are especially drawn to things they can distinguish by touch (and taste) because their vision started out quite blurry. The more things they feel, the easier it is for them to understand the difference between textures, which makes things easier to recognize by touch.

2.  Babies and toddlers find these books so engaging because they are learning to control the fine movements of their hands and fingers. This might not sound very exciting, but if you can remember the excitement of learning a musical instrument, or the satisfaction of getting better at a sport, think of how satisfying it must be to go from near-random flailing to actually willing your fingers to explore something that catches your eye.

3.  While our tiny human friends are busy exploring their environments, they have an easier time remembering and identifying things they can associate with more than one of their senses. So if you are sharing a book with your child that features an actually fuzzy bunny, they get to see the bunny, hear you talk about the bunny, and also feel how soft the bunny is.

Sensory exploration is an important part of child development. So as gimmicky as these books might appear, they offer quite a range of experiences to growing children, and even when they enter school, many kids will still gravitate towards the books that offer them something different to touch. This bias is quite strong in young children and for good reason.

 

Books for Babies program schedule:

http://www.famlit.ca/programs_and_projects/programs/babies.shtml

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