Literacy Links – the Logo Says it All!

LitLinks LogoBack in 2012, the Centre for Family Literacy noticed an increase in the number of requests for family literacy services from our community partners and other organizations that work with families. They weren’t necessarily looking to partner in programs, like Rhymes that Bind or Books for Babies, but were looking for presentations, workshops, or taster sessions that would look at specific aspects of emergent literacy and language skills. They wanted ways to reach out to the busy families in their community that weren’t able to attend ongoing programs.

Because of their understanding of the Centre’s mission and vision, and our reputation for excellence in programming, they came to us with their requests. And so it began. Literacy Links workshops were developed to address the needs of both the families and the community organizations.

Jump ahead to 2017 and Literacy Links is busier than even we anticipated. With much appreciated funding from the City of Edmonton Family and Community Support Services (FCSS), the Government of Alberta (GOA) and Edmonton Community Adult Learning Association (ECALA), we have been able to offer workshops to more families across the city in the first months of 2017 than in all of 2016. We are also presenting at a number of conferences—some for the first time.

We are doing the Literacy Links workshops in the evenings and on weekends in community leagues halls, community agencies, and child care centres. We are working with Parent Link Centres and the Early Childhood Coalitions in the Edmonton area and with others across the province. Our goal is to connect families with their communities, to help develop knowledge and grow understanding of the importance of family literacy. The program that initially started off as one off presentations has come full circle.

For more information about Literacy Links, or if you would like to explore hosting a workshop, visit the Centre for Family Literacy website

Literacy Links

Lit-Links3

Picture this, tables set around the room covered with all kinds of interesting materials, inquisitive preschoolers pulling their parent toward a table to check out all the amazing set ups. You have just entered a “The Scientist in Us All” workshop—just one of the many offered through the Centre for Family Literacy’s Literacy Links program. For the next hour or so the children lead their parents through a series of activities and experiments that amaze, amuse—and sometimes even make them believe in magic!

Children learn through play and explore their world by touching, hearing, seeing, and smelling—in other words by using their senses. They question everything, wanting to know how come? Why does? What if? A workshop like this allows parents to learn the value of following their children’s lead, to explore with them and to answer their questions. The parents may even have some questions of their own! The workshop also helps parents remember how to get into the play space, and why it is so important to connect play with their children’s learning.

Mingle about the room and you will hear chatter about exploding volcanoes, dancing spaghetti, magic flowers, and making a rainbow of colours. One dad wonders where his three-year-old learned a word like erupting, until his son points out that it is in his dinosaur book that they read almost every night. A mom is astonished when her little one, who doesn’t like to get her hands dirty, plunges wrist deep into a bowl of Goop in search of hidden treasure. A parent is amazed at her little guy as he sits still watching ever so patiently, waiting to see if a piece of spaghetti will make it to the surface before the raisin.

You may hear a facilitator explaining more about the science behind the activities, or modelling to the parents about how to ask their children questions to get more than a yes or no answer (to enhance their language skills). The facilitators will also provide parents with information about where they can find more experiments to do at home—with items they already have around the house.

100_0797.JPG  Lit-Links

The room is rarely silent—there is plenty of laughter, questions, and learning happening. And as the families leave the workshop with their activities booklet in hand, you might hear things like “that was so much fun,” “can we do this again at home?” or even “can we come here again?”

If you would like more information about this workshop or the many others offered through the Literacy Links program, please check the Centre for Family Literacy website: www.famlit.ca

5 Fun Family Literacy Workshops Offered by Literacy Links

litlinks1Picture this: a room full of adults up to their elbows in play dough, mixing secret ingredients, and volcanoes erupting before their eyes! Learning and laughter abound and so many of the adults are just plain having fun. Sound intriguing? The Centre for Family Literacy offers 15 workshops, called Literacy Links, that do all this and more. Here are just 5 of them:

  • The Scientist in Us AllAre you ready to explode volcanoes, watch flowers grow, and hear the world in a new way? Children explore their world every day and, with your help, learn language about how things work. This workshop lets everyone make  discoveries with activities that can be done at home.
  • Secret Learning Through Games – Children want to play games, especially if it is with their family. This workshop looks at the hidden learning that happens during games, simple materials that can be used to make your own, and even a game or two to take home.
  • Come Play with Me – Play is often said to be a job for children. Every day they set out to discover how the world works. Activities like drawing in pudding and listening to stories give children a strong foundation for language and literacy. This workshop uses simple household items mixed with a little imagination and a lot of laughter to create fun tools for learning.
  • Toddlers and Technology – Is it a good combination? We look at what research has to say about young children and their use of technology, how much time they should spend with technology, and what choices are out there.
  • Numbers are Everywhere – Do you need help sorting socks, measuring for a recipe, or finding Family Day on the calendar? Your child can help as they learn about numbers. We look at the early number concepts children learn while playing or helping out around the house.

Literacy develops in families first and parents are often a child’s first and most important teacher. The Literacy Links workshops help parents understand more about their children’s learning and development. The hands-on, interactive workshops highlight what the parents are already doing, and share additional ways to engage their children in fun learning opportunities at home.

So if you are interested in learning more about how snakes hear, why Goop does what it does, what skills playing with play dough develop, or how simple things like calendars, egg cartons and loose lids can provide engaging, fun learning opportunities for parents and children alike, contact us and we will show you!

Centre for Family Literacy
Website: www.famlit.ca
Literacy Links
Email: info@famlit.ca
Phone: 780.421.7323

 

Learning with Literacy Links

Picture-073

Back in 2012 there was an increase in the number of inquiries the Centre for Family Literacy received from organizations, childcare providers, and parents, about what kind of services we had to offer parents and professionals working with families with children under six years.

Parents were already attending programs that had them singing, sharing stories and books, and interacting with their child and other families in the group. They wanted to know more about why these programs were important.

Early learning and care practitioners saw the difference that bringing these activities into their own programs meant. They wanted to know how they could enhance and build more literacy into their daily activities with the children. They also wanted to know more practical ways to share what they were doing with the parents.

To meet this community need, a number of hands-on practical workshops were developed to address early literacy for parents, practitioners and anyone else interested in supporting literacy in families.

These workshops are offered in a variety of settings: daycares and day home provider agencies, community organizations, and conferences. Participants leave the workshops with information based on research as well as practical, creative, and inexpensive strategies that enhance literacy in everyday life. They also explore the important role the parent/caregiver plays in building and supporting the literacy skills of child and parent alike.

Do you know?

  • Sharing rhymes, songs, books, and stories build language skills
  • Identifying objects by shape, colour, or size are numeracy skills
  • By engaging your child in a book, you increase their enjoyment and comprehension skills
  • Having strong language skills (in any language) is the foundation for learning to read and write
  • By having a variety of writing materials available, you encourage a child to write
  • Playing games, asking questions, and taking turns develops essentials skills
  • Children are reading symbols and signs long before they are reading words
  • Shopping, cooking, and baking are rich with literacy experiences

Check out the list of workshops on the Literacy Links page of our website. If you are interested in attending a workshop or hosting one, please contact us at info@famlit.ca

hashtag: #lit_links