Linking Numeracy and Literacy

Stories are an enjoyable and effective way to explore mathematical ideas with children.

When you read books together, take time to explore and talk about mathematical ideas. It will help your children see and understand the math that happens all around them every day.

 

Children’s Books:

  • Encourage children to re-create stories in their own way, as well as to practice math skills
  • Provide a meaningful context to explore mathematical ideas
  • Suggest problems that can be solved using different strategies
  • Develop math concepts such as following directions, finding shapes in the environment and ideas about greater than and less than
  • Encourage the use of math language such as How many? How far? How much?
  • Help make sense of the world

When Reading Together:

  • When reading, talk together. Ask questions that need more than a yes or no answer
  • Introduce related math ideas
  • Don’t be afraid to use math vocabulary
  • Give children a chance to explain their thinking

Story Books:

  • Talk about the page numbers. What comes next? What number is the last page?
  • Talk about the pictures and what is happening in the story. Did something change? Why?
  • Talk about patterns in the story. Notice rhyming word patterns too
  • Notice the sequence of events: “What happened first? What happens next? What happened first? Second?
  • Wonder aloud about more than, less than and equal to
  • Count items on a page

Counting Books:

There are a number of good counting books that are enjoyable for both children and adults, and help to develop early numeracy and literacy skills. Books that count 0 to 5 or 0 to 10 are best for preschoolers.

Look for books that contain:

  • Engaging and colorful pictures
  • Easy to count items
  • Numerals that are easy to identify and are printed clearly

Things to Do with Counting Books:

  • Count the objects together
  • How many do you think will be on the next page?
  • How many would there be if there was one more? How many if there was one less?
  • Have your child place out a toy or other item for each number you read
  • If your child is familiar with the story, have them tell you what comes next

Some Good Books

Title Author
Tall Jez Alborough
Ship Shapes Stella Blackstone
Big Sarah’s Little Boots Paulette Bourgeois
The Greedy Triangle Marilyn Burns
1,2,3, to the Zoo Eric Carle
The Hungry Caterpillar Eric Carle
Pumpkin Soup Helen Cooper
Freight Train Donald Crews
Carry Me, Mama Monica Devine
I Am Small Emma Dodd
Ten Little Caterpillars Lois Ehlert
Color Zoo Lois Ehlert
Round like a Ball Lisa Campbell Ernst
Turtle Splash Cathryn Falwell
Two Shoes, Blue Shoes, New Shoes Sally Fitz-Gibbon
My Sister Ate One Hare Bill Grossman
Lots of Dots Craig Frazier
A Second is a Hiccup Hazel Hutchins
The Doorbell Rang Pat Hutchins
Stuck Oliver Jeffers
Five Creatures Emily Jenkins
Actual Size Steve Jenkins
Mama, Do You Love me? Barbara Joosse
The Wheels on the Bus Maryann Kovalski
We All Went on Safari Laurie Krebs
Who Took the Cookies from the Cookie Jar? Bonnie Las
Inch by Inch Leo Lionni
Ten Cats Have Hats Jean Marzello
I Spy book series Jean Marzello
Lessons from Mother Earth Elaine McLeod
Quack, Quack, Moo We See You! Kelly Mij

If you would like to learn more about integrating math concepts into children’s daily routines, please visit the Centre for Family Literacy website to find out about our programs and training.

Everyday Essential Skills

Essential Skills are the skills that we use every day. These 9 skills are required for work, school, learning, and life. Essential skills provide us a strong foundation for learning all other skills and allow us to navigate our lives and daily routines.

From the minute our eyes open in the morning until the moment we slip off to sleep in the evening, we are using each of the 9 Essential Skills. In fact, a lot of the time we are not even aware that we are using these skills, as they are such a strong part of our everyday routine.

It is important for us to be able to take the time to identify when, where, and how we are using these skills in our daily routines. Once we begin to explore our use of Essential Skills, we can support our children in using these skills in a very thoughtful and intentional way. By supporting the development of Essential Skills in our children, we are helping them build a strong foundation for all other types of learning, growth, and development.

WHAT ARE THE 9 ESSENTIAL SKILLS

Reading

  • Reading different types of materials such as letters, books, manuals, instructions, street signs, reports, agendas, emails, recipes, etc.
  • Includes both print and non-print media

Writing

  • Doing tasks such as writing a grocery list, signing your name, filling in a form
  • Includes both paper and non-paper based writing such as writing a note to your child’s teacher or writing an email to your employer
  • Includes all forms of early writing in children such as scribbling

Oral Communication

  • The use of speech to give and exchange thoughts and information
  • Includes storytelling, singing, and rhyming

Working with Others

  • The ability to work and interact with others to accomplish a task
  • Recognizing the importance of team work
  • Setting reasonable expectations and problem solving

Numeracy

  • The ability to work with and use numbers, and the ability to perform calculating and estimating tasks
  • Handling money, budgeting, measuring, sorting, patterning, etc

Document Use

  • The ability to use words, numbers, symbols, and other visual displays to make meaning of things
  • Using and being able to read charts, schedules, graphs, report cards, drawings, signs, and labels

Thinking Skills

  • Being able to solve problems, make decisions, find and evaluate information, plan, and organize
  • Often used in combination with many other essential skills

Continuous Learning

  • Participating in the ongoing process of learning new skills and knowledge
  • Trying out a new hobby or trying out a new recipe
  • People can develop new skills at any time and at any age

Digital Technology

  • The ability to use computers or computerized equipment, different kinds of computer applications, and the internet
  • Being able to use a variety of computerized platforms to search for information
  • Participating in social media

As parents we are incredibly busy. We work hard to balance our jobs, children, household responsibilities, social interests, school, and community, etc. There simply is not time for us to add anything else to our daily lives.

However, supporting Essential Skill awareness and development in our children is almost effortless. Since we use these skills each and every day, we can easily identify naturally occurring moments within our routine where we can support and enhance this learning.

Let’s take a look at a few events from a typical day for a family, and I will show you just how easy it can be to include meaningful Essential Skills development into your daily routine.

Now that we are able to identify the 9 Essential Skills, have an understanding of their importance and where we use them daily, we can be more intentional in how we apply them in our daily lives at home, school, work, and in our community.

To make these moments meaningful learning opportunities for our children we can:

  • Make a game of identifying when, where, and how we use these skills every day, i.e.: “Eye Spy” an Essential Skill!
  • Talk about the skills while you are using them, and discuss how you are using them.
  • Ask your children open ended questions to support them in exploring their unique use of these skills.
  • Discuss how each skill helps to get things done. Could tasks be completed another way using other Essential Skills?
  • Explore how the learning from one skill can transfer to another, and how certain tasks require multiple Essential Skills.
  • Talk to children about the different Essential Skills you may use in a variety of careers. What do they want to be when they grow up? What skills will they need to use daily?
  • Engage your children in the development of their routine and one for the whole family.
  • Model healthy and fun attitudes and behaviours when using these skills in your life.

For more information on Essential Skills or Literacy Links Workshops available in your community, contact the Centre for Family Literacy: email info@famlit.ca or phone 780-421-7323.

The 7 Types of Play and the Role of the Parent in Play-Based Learning

In my previous blog, “Come Play with Me,” we explored the concept and importance of play-based learning and the different stages of play that children experience as they develop. We now know that play is critical to children’s early development and key to supporting their emergent literacy skills. We also know that children will move through a variety of stages in their own unique way. These stages form a continuum of growth and development and, although there are age guidelines for each stage, children will move through this continuum at their own pace. Only when they have successfully experienced one stage will they move to the next.

THE 7 TYPES OF PLAY

Think back to when you were children yourselves. What were some of your favourite ways to play? Did you enjoy creating art? Perhaps you preferred tag or hide and seek. Maybe you were more interested in building towers and constructing Lego towns. Did you gravitate towards board games, or prefer getting messy while experimenting in the kitchen?

Regardless of which type of play you enjoyed the most, you would have naturally explored all 7 types of play at one time or another. Each type of play is very similar to the different learning styles and, although they will explore them all, children will choose one strong style of learning and one type of preferred play. Knowing how your children learn best, and which type of play they prefer, allows you to plan activities that best suit your children’s needs.

Physical Play

  • Often described as rough and tumble play
  • Children develop their gross and fine motor skills
  • Children develop coordination, body control, body awareness, sense of self, and risk taking and impulse control
  • Children who prefer physical play often have a strong understanding of what their body is capable of

Language Play

  • Children will rhyme, sing, tell stories, and make up songs
  • They will explore language by making up new words, phrases, or sounds
  • Children will turn anything into a pencil and paper, i.e. writing letters in the sand using a stick
  • Children who enjoy language play will often have strong early reading and writing skills

Exploratory Play

  • This type of play is all about exploring
  • Children will be learning how to learn and developing a curiosity and love of learning
  • Children will explore by using all of their senses, testing ideas and asking many questions
  • Children who prefer exploratory play are often lifelong learners

Constructive Play

  • This type of play involves building, taking things apart, and putting them back together
  • Children use blocks, clay, playdough, tinker trays, loose parts, anything they can get their hands on
  • This type of play supports many skills: numeracy, trial and error, planning, self-expression, hand-eye coordination, and more
  • Children who gravitate towards this type of play are often referred to as “future engineers”

Fantasy Play

  • In fantasy play, children imagine and explore
  • This is the type of play where children will be anything but themselves
  • They create their own characters and stories and act them out
  • Children explore all kinds of possibilities and experiences
  • Children who prefer fantasy play often have very strong comprehension and predictability skills

Social Play

  • Children play together with others
  • All the children work towards a common goal
  • They will be developing their skills in team work, problem solving, taking turns, and following rules
  • Children learn the manners associated with play and competition
  • Children who primarily enjoy social play often work well with others and have problem solving skills

Expressive Play

  • These children are your artists, musicians, or poets
  • They enjoy expressing their feelings, thoughts, and personalities through art, music and writing
  • Children display their feelings and what they know in a visual way
  • Children who enjoy expressive play are incredibly creative and natural problem solvers

THE PARENT’S ROLE IN SUPPORTING PLAY-BASED LEARNING

We know that play is our children’s job. Through play they develop in all ways. But what is our role as parents? How can we support our children’s development through play?

Be Patient

Children need to explore activities in their own way. Some children explore at great length while others move very quickly from activity to activity. Allow your children the time they need to experience all activities in the way they choose.

Explore all Types of Play

Similar to learning styles, children naturally gravitate towards one type of play; however, it is important that they are exposed to all types of play. As parents, we can support this by offering our children a variety of activities, experiences, and methods of play. Share with them your favourite ways to play!

Let Them Take the Lead

Let your children guide the direction of their play. Sit back and follow their lead. Let your children show you how they want to do the activity or play the game. Give them a turn at being the leader and then you take a turn to guide their play in a new direction!!

Throw Out the Rule Book

There is no right or wrong way to play. Toss out the rule book and explore new ways to do things. This is often one of the hardest things for us to do as adults. We each have our own way of doing something and often impose this on our children. However, play follows no rules and the best learning comes from the ability to explore things in new ways.

Model, Model, Model

Show your children that play is a lifelong skill that does not have an expiry date. Even as adults we still play. Whether you are part of a sports team, enjoy doing puzzles, love playing Candy Crush, or enjoy making a mess in the kitchen, your children will see you having fun and that will influence them to do the same!

PLAY!!

You are your child’s first and best teacher, so naturally you are their best playmate! Be silly, have fun, be open to doing things their way, and make memories together!

For more information on our Literacy Links workshop “Come Play with Me” or any of our other early literacy workshops, please contact the Centre for Family Literacy: email info@famlit.ca or phone 780-421-7323.

 

Come Play With Me!

One of the workshops offered through our Literacy Links workshop series is called “Come Play with Me.” This has been one of the more popular training opportunities and is booked regularly. Learning through play is a concept that has been trending for many years and is widely supported by parents and practitioners. But what is play and why is it important?

The Webster’s dictionary provides thirty-four definitions for the word play, and Oxford dictionary has over 100. Not all of us view play through the same eyes. There are many variables that influence our definition of play. These can be cultural, societal, historical, personal, educational, and global. Even our age can influence how we see play. I define play as the way our children learn about themselves, people around them, and how things work in their world. What does play mean to you?

The Importance of Play

Children learn through their everyday experiences. They do not know or particularly care about what they are learning—they are simply focused on having fun! When children play they interact with their world and use things they experience. For instance, children will draw upon things they have heard, or seen, or done, and use these experiences to play games and engage in activities. Play also gives children the opportunity to explore new things and begin making sense of them. Through play children recreate what they have learned and are able to practice all these new skills!

Play enhances almost every skill critical to the development of children. When they play, they are learning and developing:

  • Language
  • Sharing
  • Social skills
  • Cooperation
  • Creativity
  • Risk Taking
  • Imagination
  • Leadership
  • Problem solving
  • Self Awareness
  • Cultural awareness
  • Boundaries
  • Communication
  • Numeracy
  • And SO MUCH MORE!

Stages of Play

Between the ages of 0-6 years, play has been broken down into a series of stages. These stages form a continuum of growth and development that all children experience in their own unique way.

The first stage of play is called Unoccupied Play. This stage begins at birth and lasts about 3 months. Unoccupied Play is characterized by the random movements and jerks that your baby makes. These simple movements are how your baby becomes aware of their body and how to use their body parts.

Typically at 2-3 months children will move into the next stage of play which is called Solitary Play, and this stage usually lasts until children turn 3 years old. Solitary Play begins when your child is able to start holding objects. In this stage, children will play alone and will not be very interested in others. Solitary Play is considered to be the longest stage because, although they will progress through this stage, children will always return to it in some capacity even as they move into their teen years.

Onlooker Play is the stage that commonly occurs between the ages of 2.5 and 3.5. This is the observation stage where children still prefer to play alone, but now they are beginning to take an interest in how other children play. You will notice them staring at other children as they play, but remain hesitant to join them.

The next stage, Parallel Play, mimics Onlooker Play in that children will keenly observe play in other children. However, now you will find that they are beginning to ask many questions about what they observe in other children’s play. “What are they doing with those blocks?” “Why are they using red lego?” This is also the stage where children will be more interested in communicating with other children in play.

Typically between 3-4 years of age, children will progress into the stage referred to as Associative Play. There are no rules or roles in their play and children are more interested in the interactions and less interested in the toys. In this stage, children are learning cooperation, problem solving, and language, among other skills.

The final stage of play is the one parents are most excited for, Coorperative Play. Between the years of 4 and 6, children move into the Cooperative Play stage, where their play is generally focused around working with others towards a common goal. Roles are defined, and you will often see children playing house or school and during these activities they will have a role—mother, father, teacher, etc.

The final stage of play is only reached when children have had the time they need to progress through each stage before it. It is important to be patient through the stages, and let your children take as much or as little time as they need to explore each stage and move to the next. Although there is a common timeline, remember that all children are different and there is no right or wrong way to explore these stages.

In my next blog, which will be coming out May 4th, I will be exploring 7 Types of Play and sharing ideas on the role parents have in their children’s play. For more information about the importance of play, please do a search for our blogs about play in the search field above.

If you would like to find out more about attending or hosting a Literacy Links workshop, please check the Centre for Family Literacy website and/or contact the Centre for Family Literacy by email info@famlit.ca or by phone: 780.421.7323

 

Investing in Literacy is Good for Business

110616-F-TY749-009WHAT IS LITERACY?

Literacy is the foundation for all learning. An individual’s literacy level impacts their success in reading, writing, understanding, speaking, and listening. This impact extends to all areas of their life, including home, work, and community.

Family Literacy is the way parents, children, and extended family members use literacy at home, work and in the community. Family literacy is foundational to the overall wellness of an individual and their family.

Today, 45% of Albertans struggle with literacy.

Imagine the challenges that an individual will face on a daily basis—job applications, safety manuals, menus, prescriptions, instructions, signs, maps, etc.

Imagine the cost to society—to education, healthcare, social services, the criminal system, employers, the economy, you.

 

WHY BUSINESSES SHOULD INVEST IN LITERACY

A Statistics Canada survey found that lifting literacy scores by 1% could lift labour productivity by 2.5% and raise output per capita by 1.5%.

Companies who invest in family literacy workshops as part of their commitment to employee wellness are innovative and forward thinking. These companies are also smart investors because the increase of employee wellness in the workplace reduces costs and increases employee productivity.

Research shows that workplace programs that aim to do more than increase job-specific skills, that use functional materials from not only the workplace but also from home and community, are more effective than programs with a narrower scope. Family literacy activities and materials can enhance the effectiveness of workplace training.

Family Literacy helps to produce young adults, who are just entering the workforce, with the ability to read directions carefully and thereby reduce waste in the form of accidents and mistakes.

—Plant supervisor, Lucerne Foods

 

EMPLOYER BENEFITS OF INVESTING IN FAMILY LITERACY IN THE WORKPLACE:

Literacy for Business

  • Attract new employees
  • Better employee and client retention
  • Build diversity in skills and personnel
  • Improve employee morale and corporate culture
  • Reduce sickness and absenteeism
  • Enhance working relationships between colleagues and improved labour relations
  • Encourage employees to show more initiative and teamwork
  • Increase output, quality of work, and overall profitability
  • Improve health and safety records

 

EMPLOYER BENEFITS OF INVESTING IN FAMILY LITERACY IN THE WORKPLACE:

  • Earn more income
  • Employees feel supported and valued
  • Increase job satisfaction
  • Fewer occupational injuries
  • Have greater opportunities for job mobility
  • More likely to participate in further training
  • Greater economic security
  • Increase confidence and self-esteem
  • Increase social awareness and self-advocacy
  • Better able to support their children’s language, literacy, and numeracy development

Each dollar invested in a family literacy workshop goes twice as far, supporting early childhood development as well as adult basic and continued education.

This investment supports a family’s intergenerational cycle of achievement.

 

HOW THE CENTRE FOR FAMILY LITERACY CAN HELP

LitLinks5Employees with children often struggle to achieve a work/life balance. There simply are not enough hours in the day to do all the things we need to do and even less time to do the things we want to do. There is no doubt that parents feel guilty when they have reduced time to spend with their children and as a family. This “unbalance” can result in low performance at work and increased stress at home.

Our workshops support families to make the most of the time they have together. Each workshop identifies naturally occurring opportunities, already present in their routine, to support both the adult’s and children’s language, literacy, and numeracy development. We give participants the tools to recognize these opportunities and build on them, without adding any more to their day.

All of our workshops are hands-on and interactive. Participants work together and draw from their own life experiences as they work through challenges and explore activities, with the information and materials we bring. Participants will leave our workshops with the tools to support their children’s learning and development, and make the most of their time together as a family. Let’s bring back the balance!

Please contact the Centre for Family Literacy for more information on Literacy Links workshops: by email: info@famlit.ca, by phone: 780.421.7323, or visit our website

Autumn Provides Easy Literacy Lessons to Share with Your Kids

Leaves4

Autumn leaves are falling down, falling down, falling down,
Autumn leaves are falling down, red, yellow, orange and brown!

Rake them up and pile them high, pile them high, pile them high,
Rake them up and pile them high, till they reach the sky!

Just reading these simple words paints a vivid picture in my mind: being sent out to clean up the yard before the holiday guests arrived for dinner. They bring back childhood memories of working so hard to rake up leaves into giant mounds that called to me to drop my rake and jump in! I can almost smell the slightly sweet odour of decay and hear the crunch of the brittle brown leaves as I scattered all my hard work.

So many opportunities for building literacy skills can be found in the simple act of cleaning up the yard. You and your child can talk about:

  • all the different colours and shapes of leaves you find
  • how the wind sounds as it blows through the leaves still clinging to the branches
  • why some plants lose their leaves while others stay green year-round
  • the different textures of the leaves—some brittle, some pokey, some soft and flexible
  • how many empty bags will be needed
  • what happens when it gets cold—where do the bugs go
  • why do the days seem shorter and so much more!

Literacy is about so much more than just reading a book or writing a letter. It encompasses learning vocabulary and how to put the words together to get an idea across, problem solving on your own or working together to find a solution, learning the meaning of our numbers—the one to one correspondence of word, numeral and object.

Autumn also means Thanksgiving is just around the corner, and literacy is embedded in the preparation and sharing of the meal. Talk with your children about:

  • recipes that have been tweaked just that much to make them unique to your family
  • how many more chairs will be needed so everyone has a seat
  • what is the true meaning of Thanksgiving and why do we celebrate it in the fall
  • the difference between a yam and a sweet potato
  • family traditions that have been passed down over the ages
  • how many pieces that pumpkin pie has to be cut into!

In our Literacy Links workshops, we focus on how you can find literacy in just about everything you do. We help adults, parents, and caregivers discover the many simple activities they can do at home and out in the community that support and build numeracy and literacy skills. As for me, I am going to go back to painting some pictures!

I made a jack-o-lantern for Halloween night,
He has three teeth, but he doesn’t bite,
He has two eyes, but he doesn’t see,
He’s a happy jack-o-lantern, as you can see!

Please visit the Centre for Family Literacy website for more information about Literacy Links workshops. If you are interested in either hosting or attending a workshop, please call the Centre, 780.421.7323

 

Children are Born Scientists

Science: Understanding the natural world based on facts learned through experiments and observation.  –Merriam-Webster


DSCN0586-crop

Children are born scientists. They learn about their world by:

  • Exploring what’s around them with their senses – seeing, touching, smelling, tasting, and listening
  • Trying to do things again and again until it works the way they want it to, or they discover a new way to do it
  • Observing what happens
  • Asking questions like why? What if? How come?
  • Watching those who mean the most to them do things

iStock_WaterPlantsChildren naturally learn this way beginning as babies, until there comes a time when hands-on learning is replaced by watching, listening, and reading about how the the world works.

Summer is the perfect time to take science outdoors. Nature itself provides a wonderful, ready made lab to observe changes in the life cycles of plants and animals. Helping to water plants, tending to a small part of a garden, or watching for various critters on a walk through the river valley or the back yard, helps children develop the skills they will need later on in school. How many different types of trees do you see on the walk? Did you know that many children can list more marketing logos than they can types of trees? Talk about the difference between deciduous and coniferous trees and what types of birds like to build their nests in them. A book from the library on plants or birds can help identify them in your neighbourhood.

Activities such as these help children understand that science is everywhere and they build early skills that will serve them for a lifetime.

Bubble playThere are plenty of messy experiments that cost very little but provide an opportunity to develop a love of science. The simple act of blowing bubbles can teach children so much. How can I make huge bubbles? Does the wind direction make a difference? What’s the right ratio of water to soap that will make the sturdiest bubbles? What happens if I twirl round and round with my bubble wand full of solution? Here are two bubble recipes to try with your little scientists:

Home Made Bubble Solution

  • ¾ cup Joy or Dawn dishwashing soap
  • 2 cups water
  • 3 tsps. Sugar
  1. Mix the sugar and water together
  2. Add the dish soap and stir gently until well mixed
  3. Dip bubble wand into bubble liquid and then blow

Giant Bubble Mix

  • 3 cups water
  • I cup Joy or Dawn dishwashing soap
  • ½ cup light corn syrup
  1. In a large bowl stir water and corn syrup until combined
  2. Add dish soap and stir very gently until well mixed
  3. Make a bubble wand out of pipe cleaners or string

Goop2Another great way to explore science is by experimenting with Goop (a mixture of corn starch and water). Did you know that cornstarch and water can form a non-Newtonian fluid? What is that you ask? When you press on the mixture it becomes a solid, but when you release the pressure it runs like a liquid. This is definitely one experiment that can go outside and the whole family can have fun with it. Hide treasures in the Goop for them to discover, and try to squeeze it into a ball and then release it. You can even put it in a plastic swimming pool and walk through it.

Goop Recipe

  • 1 ½ to 2 cups cornstarch
  • 1 cup water
  • food colouring if you want
  1. Put the water in a bowl and add a few drops food colouring if you want colour
  2. Gradually add 1½ cups cornstarch to the water and stir with a spoon or your hand
  3. A little at a time, add the remaining ½ cup of cornstarch. When you can form a ball by pressing the mixture and it turns into a liquid when you release it, it is ready. If you add too much or too little you can always adjust with more water or more cornstarch.

* DO NOT DUMP ANY LEFT OVER GOOP INTO THE SEWER OR DRAIN.

Let the water evaporate from the mixture and then put it in a plastic bag or container and throw it out with your garbage. As it dries, it resembles concrete and you don’t want to have to call a plumber.

Children are born scientists. It can be easy and inexpensive to set up fun activities for them to explore their world. The best part is when the whole family gets messy together! Have fun experimenting this summer.

Blogs are provided by the staff of the Centre for Family Literacy, www.famlit.ca

4 Reasons Kids Learn when they Play

“Play is the work of the child”
—Maria Montessori (Italian Physician & Educator)

children-463563_1920Generation after generation of children have played. This seems to tell us that play is an important part of healthy development.

An area of study called the science of learning is showing that there is more to play than meets the eye. When children play they are engaging in activities which help them to make sense of the world around them, and how to learn how to learn. And learning occurs best when children are mentally active, engaged, socially interactive, and building meaningful connections to their lives.

1. Play is Mentally Active

Children explore their world with their five senses. Rarely do children stop to think about what they are going to touch and then touch it. They launch forward—touching, hearing, seeing, smelling, and tasting—and then they think about what they have discovered.

2. Play is Engaging

It would be difficult to find playing children who are bored. Engagement is the very essence of play. Children are naturally curious and excited to learn new things, and play is the way they make sense of their world.

3. Play is Socially Interactive

Play helps children practice their skills for getting along with others and learn how to make friends. Imagination allows children to pretend to be bold superheros or parents, while still feeling safe. When parents remember how to play, they become part of their children’s play space and are then welcome to share their play world.

4. Play Builds Meaningful Connections

Our Literacy Links workshops place the focus on play, making connections in the world of the children and their parents. One little fellow exclaimed that the volcano he made was “erupting.” His dad was surprised at such a big word until the little boy reminded him that it was in the dinosaur book that they read together every night. Another mom commented that she already had everything at home that she needed to play the “Build a Robot” game with her little guy, to help him learn his numbers.

If you are interested in hosting or attending a Literacy Links workshop, check the Centre for Family Literacy website for more information!

“Children learn as they play. Most importantly, in play children learn how to learn.”
—O. Fred Donaldson

 

 

Literacy Links – the Logo Says it All!

LitLinks LogoBack in 2012, the Centre for Family Literacy noticed an increase in the number of requests for family literacy services from our community partners and other organizations that work with families. They weren’t necessarily looking to partner in programs, like Rhymes that Bind or Books for Babies, but were looking for presentations, workshops, or taster sessions that would look at specific aspects of emergent literacy and language skills. They wanted ways to reach out to the busy families in their community that weren’t able to attend ongoing programs.

Because of their understanding of the Centre’s mission and vision, and our reputation for excellence in programming, they came to us with their requests. And so it began. Literacy Links workshops were developed to address the needs of both the families and the community organizations.

Jump ahead to 2017 and Literacy Links is busier than even we anticipated. With much appreciated funding from the City of Edmonton Family and Community Support Services (FCSS), the Government of Alberta (GOA) and Edmonton Community Adult Learning Association (ECALA), we have been able to offer workshops to more families across the city in the first months of 2017 than in all of 2016. We are also presenting at a number of conferences—some for the first time.

We are doing the Literacy Links workshops in the evenings and on weekends in community leagues halls, community agencies, and child care centres. We are working with Parent Link Centres and the Early Childhood Coalitions in the Edmonton area and with others across the province. Our goal is to connect families with their communities, to help develop knowledge and grow understanding of the importance of family literacy. The program that initially started off as one off presentations has come full circle.

For more information about Literacy Links, or if you would like to explore hosting a workshop, visit the Centre for Family Literacy website

Literacy Links

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Picture this, tables set around the room covered with all kinds of interesting materials, inquisitive preschoolers pulling their parent toward a table to check out all the amazing set ups. You have just entered a “The Scientist in Us All” workshop—just one of the many offered through the Centre for Family Literacy’s Literacy Links program. For the next hour or so the children lead their parents through a series of activities and experiments that amaze, amuse—and sometimes even make them believe in magic!

Children learn through play and explore their world by touching, hearing, seeing, and smelling—in other words by using their senses. They question everything, wanting to know how come? Why does? What if? A workshop like this allows parents to learn the value of following their children’s lead, to explore with them and to answer their questions. The parents may even have some questions of their own! The workshop also helps parents remember how to get into the play space, and why it is so important to connect play with their children’s learning.

Mingle about the room and you will hear chatter about exploding volcanoes, dancing spaghetti, magic flowers, and making a rainbow of colours. One dad wonders where his three-year-old learned a word like erupting, until his son points out that it is in his dinosaur book that they read almost every night. A mom is astonished when her little one, who doesn’t like to get her hands dirty, plunges wrist deep into a bowl of Goop in search of hidden treasure. A parent is amazed at her little guy as he sits still watching ever so patiently, waiting to see if a piece of spaghetti will make it to the surface before the raisin.

You may hear a facilitator explaining more about the science behind the activities, or modelling to the parents about how to ask their children questions to get more than a yes or no answer (to enhance their language skills). The facilitators will also provide parents with information about where they can find more experiments to do at home—with items they already have around the house.

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The room is rarely silent—there is plenty of laughter, questions, and learning happening. And as the families leave the workshop with their activities booklet in hand, you might hear things like “that was so much fun,” “can we do this again at home?” or even “can we come here again?”

If you would like more information about this workshop or the many others offered through the Literacy Links program, please check the Centre for Family Literacy website: www.famlit.ca