Stop Just Reading Books! Start Living Books!

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Every child has a favourite book, a story that they want read to them over and over again. For parents, this can become quite boring. At 3,2,1, Fun! we have spent the last few weeks showing families how to stop just reading books and how to start living books. To support families in increasing their children’s learning, we have been sharing ideas and activities to extend a simple story book.

Children choose their favourite books or stories for a variety of reasons. Perhaps they love the drawings, or maybe they can relate to the characters in the story. Once children have chosen their favourite books, it is only a matter of time before they begin to learn the words and predict the events. Before you know it, they can recite the story from start to finish! When this happens, it does not mean they have become bored with the story, though the parents may have. It simply means we need to take the book to the next level. Let me show you how to bring your children’s favourite books to life!

 

Rainbow Fish by Marcus Pfister

Go Fishing!

You don’t need a boat or even a lake to take your children fishing. Fill the bathtub or a plastic bucket with water. Attach paper clips to some plastic fish and drop them in the water. Use a wooden dowel with string and a magnet as the fishing rod. You can challenge your children to count each fish they catch or to only catch certain colours or shapes. The possibilities are endless and the fun is guaranteed!

Make your own Rainbow Fish

Using paper plates and any other craft or recyclable materials you have around the house, your children can create their own Rainbow Fish or fish aquarium. They can explore shapes, sizes, and patterns as they create. Use the finished craft as a prop the next time you read the book.

Snack

Place a handful of Gold Fish crackers at the bottom of a small bowl. Using a short piece of stringy liquorice, tie a gummy worm to the end of a pretzel stick. Voila!! You have an edible fishing snack for your children.

Sing!

“1, 2, 3, 4, 5 once I caught a fish alive,
6, 7, 8, 9, 10 then I threw him back again.
Why did you let him go?
Because he bit my finger so!
Which finger did he bite?
The little finger on my right!”

 

Going on a Bear Hunt by M. Rosen

We can’t go over it, we can’t go under it, we’ll have to go through it!

Course

Build an obstacle course in your living room, basement, or back yard using furniture, cardboard boxes, etc. Have your children go through the obstacle course in a pattern of their choosing. They can explore going over, under, and through. Not only is this a fun activity for your children, but they will be working on their patterning and predicting skills at the same time.

Go on a Bear Hunt!

Create a scavenger hunt for your children. If you really want to get creative, you can even craft a treasure map for them to follow.

Snack

To reinforce the theme of patterns you can cut up a variety of fruits and cheeses and have your children create their own snack pattern on a skewer, or on an edible necklace made with a long piece of stringy liquorice and fruit loops.

 

The Doorbell Rang by Pat Hutchins

Bake Cookies

Following a recipe and baking allow your children to work on a wide variety of numeracy and literacy skills while having fun. Once you are finished baking you can read the story and split the fresh baked cookies among family and friends!

Sing

“Way up high in a cookie tree,
two little cookies smiles at me.
So I shook that tree as hard as I could,
down came the cookies!
MMMMMMM they were good!”

These are just a few ideas on how you can turn a simple story into an adventure full of fun and learning for your children. By choosing to live your children’s favourite story books you are not only bringing to life their literary world, but you are providing them the opportunity to learn through their experiences. These learning opportunities will shape them for years to come and will surely build your family’s legacy of learning.

Visit our website for more information about the 3,2,1,FUN! program.

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Merry Christmas from Learn Together – Grow Together

Christmas-dad-kids-baking

With Christmas right around the corner, the team at Learn Together, Grow Together wanted to emphasize family literacy opportunities through the holiday season. Our focus was on identifying everyday occasions to learn while participating in holiday activities. These were some of the ideas shared by our program families.

–   Sharing a children’s book. Some of our family’s favourites were:

  • Pete the Cat Saves Christmas – Eric Litwin
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas – Dr. Seuss
  • Santa’s Noisy Night – Julie Sykes and Tim Warnes
  • A Porcupine in a Pine Tree: A Canadian 12 Days of Christmas – Helaine Becker and Werner Zimmerman
  • The Penguin who Wanted to be Different: A Christmas Wish – Maria O’Neill

–   Singing together as a family. Some of our family’s favourites were:

  • Jingle Bells
  • Frosty the Snowman
  • Rudolf the Red Nose Reindeer
  • Deck the Halls

–   Cooking and baking together for family and friends. Some of the favourite recipes shared were:

  • Gingerbread
  • Sugar Cookies
  • Egg Nog
  • Spicy cheese ball

–   Spending time with family. Some of the favourite holiday activities were:

  • Writing letters to Santa
  • Tobogganing
  • Decorating the house
  • Building a snowman

As you can see from our list, there are many opportunities for you and your children to foster literacy during the holidays when activities are done together as a family. Have fun creating holiday memories this season!

More about Learn Together, Grow Together

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Intergenerational Rhymes that Bind

RTB-IntergenWhen an old person dies a whole library disappears.”
– African proverb

Rhymes that Bind is an oral family literacy program that parents and their children attend together. It encourages parents to sing, rhyme, talk, and play with their children as much as possible.

For centuries, adults have been using rhymes, songs, and stories to entertain, teach, and relay news to others. Many years ago, children grew up immersed in this oral tradition. Unfortunately, this oral practice has become lost due to smaller family units and a lack of nearby extended family.

Rhymes that Bind is a program with the ability to fill this gap by reconnecting families to this wonderful oral tradition, particularly through our Intergenerational Rhymes that Bind programs.

Through valuable partnerships, the Centre for Family Literacy facilitates several Intergenerational Rhymes that Bind programs in Edmonton. These programs are facilitated in senior living communities and the residents are welcome and encouraged to attend and participate. Many parents choose to attend our intergenerational sites because they do not have grandparents or extended family living nearby, and fostering these generational relationships is very important to them.

When attending one of our Intergenerational Rhymes that Bind programs, you are immediately overcome with a strong sense of community and family. Bringing together three generations creates a wonderfully unique environment.

  • Watch as the parents walk with their children around the room to visit each senior in attendance.
  • See welcoming smiles and warm embraces.
  • Hear the children squeal in delight as they recognize the grandmas and grandpas from last week.
  • Feel an overwhelming sense of respect, gratitude, and adoration.

Each generation is involved in our programming and participates as much or as little as they like. We sing songs and rhymes that the parents and children love, and those that are shared by our seniors. Some of our favourites are:

  • You Are My Sunshine
  • I’ve Been Working on the Railroad
  • Oh Susanna
  • Billy Boy

On many occasions, one of our seniors in attendance will share a song that sparks a memory in one of our parents, and I’ll hear, “I haven’t heard that song since I was a kid. My parents used to sing that to me!” Instantly, this parent has been reconnected with a memory from their past and you can trust that this is now a song they will sing to their children. In that very moment, a tradition lives on.

We will have new sessions beginning in January. Please check our website for the new schedule – coming soon!

 

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3,2,1,FUN!

Let’s Make the Holidays COUNT!

holiday_baking

Holidays are a busy time for many families; there is so much to do! You might want to clean and decorate the house, plan and prepare the meal, and entertain guests. You might also travel to spend time with family. While the holidays are full of opportunities to share time and traditions with family and friends, they are also the perfect time to explore and encourage numeracy with your children.

For example, this Thanksgiving 3,2,1, Fun! focused on providing easy, meaningful and everyday ways to work on numeracy skills in the home and community over the holidays. We used inexpensive materials to create paper bag turkeys and numbered them 1-10. We used yellow beads for corn feed and glued feathers on clothes pins. Then each child picked a paper bag turkey and used the number on the front of the turkey to determine how many pieces of corn to feed their turkey and how many tail feathers to clip on. As each child built their turkeys 1-10, we sang about 5 fat turkeys as they gobbled and waddled their way through Thanksgiving!

(Sung to the tune of Frere Jacques. Count down from 5-1)

Five fat turkeys, five fat turkeys
In a barn, in a barn
Gobble, gobble, gobble
Waddle, waddle, waddle
Run away, it’s Thanksgiving Day

Holiday preparations and celebrations offer many opportunities to learn together as a family. Here are a few of the activities we share in 3,2,1, Fun! to encourage numeracy skills:

Planning and Preparing the Meal

  • Let your child look through the grocery store flyer and circle all of the holiday foods they see, cut them out and sort them into food groups.
  • Ask your child to help you number or sort the items while creating your shopping list.
  • Baking and cooking are wonderful occasions to work on numeracy. Recipes are full of opportunities for children to measure, count, order, and sort. When serving the meal, ask your children to help you carve the turkey or cut the pie. Talk to them about how many pieces of pie or turkey you will need for the number of guests you have. Ask them to help set the table. How many forks and napkins will we need?

Decorate the House

  • Create decorations from seasonal items outside. Instead of raking all those leaves and acorns, have your children collect some. They can create wonderful decorations from these items and in the process they will be identifying shapes, sorting, and creating patterns.

Travel

  • If you are travelling for the holiday, travel games will make the time fly by. Count the number of trucks/cars/bikes that you see, guess which colour of automobile you will see the most of on your trip or identify the shapes of traffic signs as you drive by them.
  • Sing a song!

The holidays are busy and hectic, fun and exciting, but above all else they are memorable. Have fun and be creative because the opportunities to learn as a family and explore numeracy will be COUNTLESS!

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