What books are we reading over the holidays?

 

young mother reading bedtime story to her little childrenTurn off the TV, put your phone on silent, and warm your heart with some great books over the holiday season. Below are some books the Centre’s staff will be reading and sharing over the holidays.

•  Box Socials by W.P. Kinsella
The story is told from a young boy’s perspective and spans about 10 years. It is about growing up in rural Alberta in the 1930s and its rituals.

•  150+ Screen-Free Activities for Kids: The Very Best and Easiest Playtime Activities by Asia Citro
This book is a must for parents and educators/facilitators. The photos are spectacular, the ideas are wonderful, and there are variations for each activity. It wil provide hours of fun!

•  Gossie by Oliver Dunrea
This delightful book about Gossie, “a bright yellow gosling who likes to wear her bright red boots – everyday” is written in simple, everyday language with lots of predictable words that children pick up right away.

•  Bedtime Math by Laura Overdeck
A book that makes math a fun part of children’s everyday lives.

•  The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry and the Big Hungry Bear by Audrey Wood and Don Wood
The Little Mouse will do all he can to save his strawberry from the big hungry bear. A staff member said, “Our son received this book as a gift when he was 2, and it was one of our family favourites.”

•  Where Children Sleep by James Mollison
A beautiful coffee table book that is both a captivating photo essay for adults, and an educational book that engages children themselves in the lives of other children around the world.

•  The Little Engine that Could by Watty Piper
An oldie but goodie that reminds us all to keep trying, whether we are young or old.

•  The Back of the Turtle by Thomas King
Filled with well-drawn characters, told with wit and a thorough knowledge of native myth and storytelling, this novel tackles the years of history between native and non-native people.

Enjoy and let us know what books will be on your list.

National Grandparent’s Day

grandfather and babyThis year, National Grandparents’ Day is on Sunday, September 7. The special day began in Canada in 1995 when Liberal MP Mr. Sarkis Assadourin presented motion number 273 in the House of Commons.

The motion read, “That, in the opinion of this House, the government should consider designating the second Sunday in September of each year as Grandparents’ Day in order to acknowledge their importance to the structure of the family in the nurturing, upbringing and education of children.”

Some of us are cynical and think that Grandparents’ Day was created to support florists and greeting card companies. But when we think about the important role that grandparents play in connecting generations, it is apparent that the stronger the relationship between grandparents, parents, and grandchildren, the stronger the family.

Besides cards and flowers, here are a few ideas that your family might do together this year:

  • Create a family tree using photos so that everyone can put a name to a face. This is also a great way for grandparents to share those family stories.
  • Ask grandparents to share their favourite recipes and compile them into a cookbook so everyone has a copy.
  • Play a favourite board or card game from your grandparents’ youth.
  • Visit the neighbourhood where your grandparents grew up, and talk about how things have changed.

What traditions have your family developed to make this day special?

What do you do if the grandparents live in another place? Maybe there is an elderly couple or person who plays the role of grandparent for your children – include them in your celebrations.