Exploring Numeracy with 3,2,1, FUN!

The Centre for Family Literacy’s 3,2,1, FUN! program is about exploring numeracy literacy with parents together with their preschool children. Numeracy includes concepts that help with understanding math later in school. Having a good foundation in numeracy means that we have an understanding of numbers, shapes, and measurements and how they relate to each other. Reinforced by the parent-child relationship, real-life, everyday experiences support this understanding.

At the Centre for Family Literacy we believe programs like 3,2,1, FUN! are beneficial to children and their development. We provide fun activities and songs for each session using numeracy-based books. This helps spark the imagination to create similar activities in your own everyday lives.

Introducing number sense can be as easy as counting the steps into the library, counting the spoonfuls of macaroni you put on your children’s plates, making a grocery list, and counting items into the cart then checking them off the list.

When my children were little I had a Day Home. We often went on outings to the library, the community centre, and the park, but most memorable were our scavenger hunt walks. On these days, the children and I took a wagon and empty recycling bags with us. Wearing gloves, the children picked up bottles which we bagged and took to the recycling depot. Afterwards, we had a fun trip to the dollar store so they could spend the money they earned.

Simple activities like this have many benefits. The children were:

  • out in the fresh air
  • having fun
  • helping the environment
  • getting to know their community
  • learning money sense
  • sharing

What type of outing could you create with your children in your own neighbourhood?

Visit the Centre for Family Literacy website to find out more about the 3,2,1,FUN! program!

Talking to Babies in Different Languages

We work with mothers, fathers, grandparents, and caregivers from a number of countries and backgrounds. Together they speak more than 60 languages, and for many of these families, that means that more than one language is being spoken at home.

Children born into these homes are incredibly fortunate. There are many benefits to being able to speak more than one language. Languages create connections between generations, between cultures, and between places all around the world. And having more connections to our world and the people in it is a wonderful gift.

So, how can babies best learn more than one language?

The first part is easy: they need to learn from people. Face-to-face interaction is by far the best way for babies to learn new languages. Videos, apps, and recordings will not help babies. Video chat is the only exception. The second part is that, when they are old enough to speak, they have to use the new language regularly.

When I first started in this field, there were concerns about confusing babies with different languages, so recommendations were quite rigid. But research from the last 10 years  suggests that babies are not that easy to confuse, so you can explore an approach to multiple languages that works best for you and your family.

Here is an excellent guide from Nexus Health in Ontario. It discusses the benefits, different  strategies, and ways children learn multiple languages: “When children speak more than one language”.

Whether you are fluent in one language or can speak in many, have fun singing and talking with your babies. I promise that they want to hear from you.

Visit the Centre for Family Literacy website for more resources and tip sheets for parents.